Archive for April, 2008

DNC “100″ Ad on John McCain and Iraq Uses the Injury of Soldiers for Political Gain, by Showing Soldiers Being Attacked

April 30, 2008

Here is the ad, entitled “100″ that the Democratic National Committee put out earlier last week, discussing John McCain and the Iraq War:

(Note, I’ve received information that the troops here were probably only injured, and not killed.)  Did you notice at 8 seconds, the video of the explosion and the 2 soldiers being blown down (and presumably dying being injured, and possibly worse)?  That right there is DISRESPECTFUL and DISHONORING to those men.  They sacrificed their lives for the sake of this country, and the DNC has NO RIGHT to use their deaths injuries for political gain.  I don’t care who you are, from John McCain to Hillary Clinton, images of troops being injured or killed should NEVER be used for political gain.  Now, obviously if somebody wants to show images of themselves being injured (perhaps somebody wants to start a PAC and show the effects of the war), then that’s fine, but when you use images of our troops being injured, without permission, that is one of the most disgraceful and un-American things possible.

This isn’t even to mention the fact that the “100 years” quote is taken out of context.  McCain was referring to a situation like South Korea, where we are STILL there, but not getting attacked.  Why don’t people have a problem with our troops being in South Korea?  Probably because people don’t even know we’re still there.  I have no problem with troops being in Iraq in 100 years, as long as we don’t have a lot of them over there, and as long as they aren’t there to take the place of Iraqi forces who aren’t doing their jobs.

Shame on the DNC for putting this ad out, and shame on Obama and Clinton for not denouncing it.

I don’t think we should have gone into Iraq, but I sure don’t think that images like this should be used to benefit ANYBDOY politically.

Done Ranting,

Ranting Republican
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John McCain Releases New Ad and Gives Speech: Health Care Action

April 29, 2008

Alright, so John McCain released a new ad today, giving a rough outline of his health care plan:

I thought the ad was good overall.  It briefly addressed each of his main points.  The music fit well.  He could’ve elaborated more on allowing people to cross state lines to get health care.  I guess the biggest problem I had with it, is the fact that he is clearly sick while filming the add, which makes it somewhat ironic.  Overall, I give this add a grade of B.

McCain also gave a speech today, at the University of South Florida, Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, in Tampa:

Remarks By John McCain On Health Care On Day Two Of The “Call To Action Tour”

April 29, 2008

ARLINGTON, VA — U.S. Senator John McCain will deliver the following remarks as prepared for delivery at the University of South Florida – Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute, in Tampa, FL, today at 10:00 a.m. EDT:

Thank you. I appreciate the hospitality of the University of South Florida, and this opportunity to meet with you at the Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute. Speaker Moffitt, Dr. Dalton, Dean Klasko, thank you for the invitation, and for your years of dedication that have made this campus a center of hope for cancer victims everywhere. It’s good to see some other friends here, including your board member and my friend and former colleague Connie Mack. And my thanks especially to the physicians, administrators, and staff of this wonderful place.

Sometimes in our political debates, America’s health-care system is criticized as if it were just one more thing to argue about. Those of you involved in running a research center like this, or managing the children’s hospital that I visited yesterday in Miami, might grow a little discouraged at times listening to campaigns debate health care. But I know you never lose sight of the fact that you are each involved in one of the great vocations, doing some of the greatest work there is to be done in this world. Some of the patients you meet here are in the worst hours of their lives, filled with fear and heartache. And the confident presence of a doctor, the kind and skillful attentions of a nurse, or the knowledge that researchers like you are on the case, can be all they have to hold onto. That is a gift only you can give, and you deserve our country’s gratitude.

I’ve had a tour here this morning, and though I can’t say I absorbed every detail of the research I certainly understand that you are making dramatic progress in the fight against cancer. With skill, ingenuity, and perseverance, you are turning new technologies against one of the oldest enemies of humanity. In the lives of cancer patients, you are adding decades where once there were only years, and years where once there were only months. You are closing in on the enemy, in all its forms, and one day you and others like you are going to save uncounted lives with a cure for cancer. In all of this, you are showing the medical profession at its most heroic.

In any serious discussion of health care in our nation, this should always be our starting point – because the goal, after all, is to make the best care available to everyone. We want a system of health care in which everyone can afford and acquire the treatment and preventative care they need, and the peace of mind that comes with knowing they are covered. Health care in America should be affordable by all, not just the wealthy. It should be available to all, and not limited by where you work or how much you make. It should be fair to all; providing help where the need is greatest, and protecting Americans from corporate abuses. And for all the strengths of our health-care system, we know that right now it falls short of this ideal.

And this right here proves Dean’s erroneous accusations that McCain doesn’t want children to have health care wrong.  Obviously, McCain wants everybody to have health care, he just doesn’t think the government should be running the health care system.

Some 47 million individuals, nearly a quarter of them children, have no health insurance at all. Roughly half of these families will receive coverage again with a mother or father’s next job, but that doesn’t help the other half who will remain uninsured. And it only draws attention to the basic problem that at any given moment there are tens of millions of Americans who lost their health insurance because they lost or left a job.

Another group is known to statisticians as the chronically uninsured. A better description would be that they have been locked out of our health insurance system. Some were simply denied coverage, regardless of need. Some were never offered coverage by their employer, or couldn’t afford it. Some make too little on the job to pay for coverage, but too much to qualify for Medicaid or other public programs. There are many different reasons for their situation. But what they all have in common is that if they become ill, or if their condition gets worse, they will be on their own – something that no one wants to see in this country.

Underlying the many things that trouble our health care system are the fundamental problems of cost and access. Rising costs hurt those who have insurance by making it more expensive to keep. They hurt those who don’t have insurance by making it even harder to obtain. Rising health care costs hurt employers and the self-employed alike. And in the end they threaten serious and lasting harm to the entire American economy.

These rising costs are by no means always accompanied by better quality in care or coverage. In many respects the system has remained less reliable, less efficient, more disorganized and prone to error even as it becomes more expensive. It has also become less transparent, in ways we would find unacceptable in any other industry. Most physicians groups and medical providers don’t publish their prices, leaving Americans to guess about the cost of care, or else to find out later when they try to make sense of an endless series of “Explanation of Benefits” forms.

There are those who are convinced that the solution is to move closer to a nationalized health care system. They urge universal coverage, with all the tax increases, new mandates, and government regulation that come along with that idea. But in the end this will accomplish one thing only. We will replace the inefficiency, irrationality, and uncontrolled costs of the current system with the inefficiency, irrationality, and uncontrolled costs of a government monopoly. We’ll have all the problems, and more, of private health care — rigid rules, long waits and lack of choices, and risk degrading its great strengths and advantages including the innovation and life-saving technology that make American medicine the most advanced in the world.

I mean, look at the post office.  Compare the time it takes to wait in line at the post office, to the time it takes at a UPS station.  Or what about the Secretary of State?  If the emergency room waiting time was as long as in the SOS offices, nobody would live (not that a lot of ER waiting times are decent right now either).

The key to real reform is to restore control over our health-care system to the patients themselves. Right now, even those with access to health care often have no assurance that it is appropriate care. Too much of the system is built on getting paid just for providing services, regardless of whether those services are necessary or produce quality care and outcomes. American families should only pay for getting the right care: care that is intended to improve and safeguard their health.

Great point!

When families are informed about medical choices, they are more capable of making their own decisions, less likely to choose the most expensive and often unnecessary options, and are more satisfied with their choices. We took an important step in this direction with the creation of Health Savings Accounts, tax-preferred accounts that are used to pay insurance premiums and other health costs. These accounts put the family in charge of what they pay for. And, as president, I would seek to encourage and expand the benefits of these accounts to more American families.

Americans need new choices beyond those offered in employment-based coverage. Americans want a system built so that wherever you go and wherever you work, your health plan is goes with you. And there is a very straightforward way to achieve this.

Under current law, the federal government gives a tax benefit when employers provide health-insurance coverage to American workers and their families. This benefit doesn’t cover the total cost of the health plan, and in reality each worker and family absorbs the rest of the cost in lower wages and diminished benefits. But it provides essential support for insurance coverage. Many workers are perfectly content with this arrangement, and under my reform plan they would be able to keep that coverage. Their employer-provided health plans would be largely untouched and unchanged.

Good.  I like the fact that he’s giving those people who are happy with how they are a chance to keep their insurance the same way as it is now, unlike the Democrats.

But for every American who wanted it, another option would be available: Every year, they would receive a tax credit directly, with the same cash value of the credits for employees in big companies, in a small business, or self-employed. You simply choose the insurance provider that suits you best. By mail or online, you would then inform the government of your selection. And the money to help pay for your health care would be sent straight to that insurance provider. The health plan you chose would be as good as any that an employer could choose for you. It would be yours and your family’s health-care plan, and yours to keep.

And this makes it so that the money is actually put toward health care, just like it is when the companies are given the tax break.  This differs from our current welfare plans where I see people using their food stamps to buy THREE Snickers bars.

The value of that credit – 2,500 dollars for individuals, 5,000 dollars for families – would also be enhanced by the greater competition this reform would help create among insurance companies. Millions of Americans would be making their own health-care choices again. Insurance companies could no longer take your business for granted, offering narrow plans with escalating costs. It would help change the whole dynamic of the current system, putting individuals and families back in charge, and forcing companies to respond with better service at lower cost.

It would help extend the advantages of staying with doctors and providers of your choice. When Americans speak of “our doctor,” it will mean something again, because they won’t have to change from one doctor or one network to the next every time they change employers. They’ll have a medical “home” again, dealing with doctors who know and care about them.

And doctors won’t be overwhelmed like they would be under a universal system.  And bad doctors will be held accountable, in that they won’t get paid no matter what.  People will still have to choose their doctors.

These reforms will take time, and critics argue that when my proposed tax credit becomes available it would encourage people to purchase health insurance on the current individual market, while significant weaknesses in the market remain. They worry that Americans with pre-existing conditions could still be denied insurance. Congress took the important step of providing some protection against the exclusion of pre-existing conditions in the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act in 1996. I supported that legislation, and nothing in my reforms will change the fact that if you remain employed and insured you will build protection against the cost of treating any pre-existing condition.

Even so, those without prior group coverage and those with pre-existing conditions do have the most difficulty on the individual market, and we need to make sure they get the high-quality coverage they need. I will work tirelessly to address the problem. But I won’t create another entitlement program that Washington will let get out of control. Nor will I saddle states with another unfunded mandate. The states have been very active in experimenting with ways to cover the “uninsurables.” The State of North Carolina, for example, has an agreement with Blue Cross to act as insurer of “last resort.” Over thirty states have some form of “high-risk” pool, and over twenty states have plans that limit premiums charged to people suffering an illness and who have been denied insurance.

Good – it doesn’t create a system that the government can’t afford, which would mean just more and more taxes.  Let the states decide how to do things, putting the Constitution and Federalism to use, like they were designed to be.

As President, I will meet with the governors to solicit their ideas about a best practice model that states can follow – a Guaranteed Access Plan or GAP that would reflect the best experience of the states. I will work with Congress, the governors, and industry to make sure that it is funded adequately and has the right incentives to reduce costs such as disease management, individual case management, and health and wellness programs. These programs reach out to people who are at risk for different diseases and chronic conditions and provide them with nurse care managers to make sure they receive the proper care and avoid unnecessary treatments and emergency room visits. The details of a Guaranteed Access Plan will be worked out with the collaboration and consent of the states. But, conceptually, federal assistance could be provided to a nonprofit GAP that operated under the direction of a board that i ncluded [sic] all stakeholders groups – legislators, insurers, business and medical community representatives, and, most importantly, patients. The board would contract with insurers to cover patients who have been denied insurance and could join with other state plans to enlarge pools and lower overhead costs. There would be reasonable limits on premiums, and assistance would be available for Americans below a certain income level.

Again, giving states the choice is the best thing to do here.  And the whole interstate insurrance option is a GREAT idea.  More competition means better prices for the consumers.

This cooperation among states in the purchase of insurance would also be a crucial step in ridding the market of both needless and costly regulations, and the dominance in the market of only a few insurance companies. Right now, there is a different health insurance market for every state. Each one has its own rules and restrictions, and often guarantees inadequate competition among insurance companies. Often these circumstances prevent the best companies, with the best plans and lowest prices, from making their product available to any American who wants it. We need to break down these barriers to competition, innovation and excellence, with the goal of establishing a national market to make the best practices and lowest prices available to every person in every state.

Again – the interstate part of his plan is a GREAT idea.

Another source of needless cost and trouble in the health care system comes from the trial bar. Every patient in America must have access to legal remedies in cases of bad medical practice. But this vital principle of law and medicine is not an invitation to endless, frivolous lawsuits from trial lawyers who exploit both patients and physicians alike. We must pass medical liability reform, and those reforms should eliminate lawsuits directed at doctors who follow clinical guidelines and adhere to patient safety protocols. If Senator Obama and Senator Clinton are sincere in their conviction that health care coverage and quality is their first priority, then they will put the needs of patients before the demands of trial lawyers. They can’t have it both ways.

AMEN!!!!  I hate frivolous lawsuits (just read my blog “disclaimer”).  Too many lawsuits occur that never should be allowed to, and even the ones that should win the case, are often awarded in too great amounts.  And neither Clinton or Obama are going to say that if they ever want the chance of getting John Edwards’s delegates.

We also know from experience that coordinated care – providers collaborating to produce the best health outcome – offers better quality and can cost less. We should pay a single bill for high-quality disease care, not an endless series of bills for pre-surgical tests and visits, hospitalization and surgery, and follow-up tests, drugs and office visits. Paying for coordinated care means that every single provider is now united on being responsive to the needs of a single person: the patient. Health information technology will flourish because the market will demand it.

Again – this is a great idea.  I remember several times when my family members had to be hospitalized for various issues, and it was just charge after charge, for X test or Y medicine and then an MRI or CAT scan, and the bills just piled up.

In the same way, clinics, hospitals, doctors, medical technology producers, drug companies and every other provider of health care must be accountable to their patients and their transactions transparent. Americans should have access to information about the performance and safety records of doctors and other health care providers and the quality measures they use. Families, insurance companies, the government – whoever is paying the bill – must understand exactly what their care costs and the outcome they received.

Exactly.  One of the things that he doesn’t address specifically, but falls under this category of transparency is ambulances.  Nowadays, ambulance rides aren’t necessarily covered under insurrance plans, but they can be QUITE expensive.  And I’ve seen cases where ambulances are called unnecessarily because people simply don’t need an ambulance (such as the case of my girlfriend, who has seizures.  She’s had them in public, and people, not knowing that she doesn’t need an ambulance, call 911, and she gets hit with a huge bill).

Families also place a high value on quickly getting simple care, and have shown a willingness to pay cash to get it. If walk-in clinics in retail outlets are the most convenient, cost-effective way for families to safely meet simple needs, then no policies of government should stand in their way. And if the cheapest way to get high quality care is to use advances in Web technology to allow a doctor to practice across state lines, then let them.

Again, this emphasizes McCain’s (and Republican’s/Libertarian’s) points at large, that people/consumers should have the freedom to choose WHATEVER they want, whether that’s what we consider “conventional” or not.

As you know better than I do, the best treatment is early treatment. The best care is preventative care. And by far the best prescription for good health is to steer clear of high-risk behaviors. The most obvious case of all is smoking cigarettes, which still accounts for so much avoidable disease. People make their own choices in this country, but we in government have responsibilities and choices of our own. Most smokers would love to quit but find it hard to do so. We can improve lives and reduce chronic disease through smoking cessation programs. I will work with business and insurance companies to promote the availability and use of these programs.

OK – I need to know more about what this program would do.  I don’t like smoking, but its a choice that people have the right to make, and when the government bans smoking in private areas (in my opinion, it should be banned in public areas if that’s what people want – it’s the people’s air, it should be their choice), they begin going down a slippery slope.  I’m not saying this is what McCain wants to do, I’m just saying that I need to know more details about this specific plan before I am comfortable commenting on it.

Smoking is just one cause of chronic diseases that could be avoided or better managed, and the national resources that could be saved by a greater emphasis on preventative care. Chronic conditions – such as cancer, heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes and asthma – account for three-quarters of the nation’s annual health-care bill. In so many cases this suffering could be averted by early testing and screening, as in the case of colon and breast cancers. Diabetes and heart disease rates are also increasing today with rise of obesity in the United States, even among children and teenagers. We need to create a “next generation” of chronic disease prevention, early intervention, new treatment models and public health infrastructure. We need to use technology to share information on “best practices” in health care so every physician is up-to-date. We need to adopt new treatment programs and fi nancial [sic] incentives to adopt “health habits” for those with the most common conditions such as diabetes and obesity that will improve their quality of life and reduce the costs of their treatment.

Financial incentives for “health habits”?  This seems to cross the line to me.  If somebody wants to be obese, that’s their own choice.  I don’t see why the government should offer a monetary incentive to be healthy.  Shouldn’t the fact that you’ll live longer (in theory) be enough incentive?  If a private company wants to form to give out these incentives, then go ahead, but this is too much governemnt involvement for my liking.

Watch your diet, walk thirty or so minutes a day, and take a few other simple precautions, and you won’t have to worry about these afflictions. But many of us never quite get around to it, and the wake-up call doesn’t come until the ambulance arrives or we’re facing a tough diagnosis.

We can make tremendous improvements in the cost of treating chronic disease by using modern information technology to collect information on the practice patterns, costs and effectiveness of physicians. By simply documenting and disseminating information on best practices we can eliminate those costly practices that don’t yield corresponding value. By reforming payment systems to focus on payments for best practice and quality outcomes, we will accelerate this important change.

Government programs such as Medicare and Medicaid should lead the way in health care reforms that improve quality and lower costs. Medicare reimbursement now rewards institutions and clinicians who provide more and more complex services. We need to change the way providers are paid to focus their attention more on chronic disease and managing their treatment. This is the most important care for an aging population.

There have been a variety of state-based experiments such as Cash and Counseling or The Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) that are different from the inflexible approaches for delivering care to people in the home setting. Seniors are given a monthly allowance that they can use to hire workers and purchase care-related services and goods. They can get help managing their care by designating representatives, such as relatives or friends, to help make decisions. It also offers counseling and bookkeeping services to assist consumers in handling their programmatic responsibilities.

In these approaches, participants were much more likely to have their needs met and be satisfied with their care. Moreover, any concerns about consumers’ safety appear misplaced. For every age group in every state, participants were no more likely to suffer care-related health problems.

Again, this just goes to show that leaving it up to the states is a good idea.

Government can provide leadership to solve problems, of course. So often it comes down to personal responsibility – the duty of every adult in America to look after themselves and to safeguard the gift of life. But wise government policy can make preventative care the standard. It can put the best practices of preventative care in action all across our health-care system. Over time that one standard alone, consistently applied in every doctor’s office, hospital, and insurance company in America, will save more lives than we could ever count. And every year, it will save many billions of dollars in the health-care economy, making medical care better and medical coverage more affordable for every citizen in this country.

Preventative stuff IS cheaper in the long run.  Sure, it costs more at the beginning, but it’s (usually) cheaper in the long run.

Good health is incentive enough to live well and avoid risks, as we’re all reminded now and then when good health is lost. But if anyone ever requires further motivation, they need only visit a place like the Moffitt Center, where all the brilliance and resourcefulness of humanity are focused on the task of saving lives and relieving suffering. You’re an inspiration, and not only to your patients. You’re a reminder of all that’s good in American health care, and we need that reminder sometimes in Washington. I thank you for your kind attention this morning, I thank you for the heroic work you have done here, and I wish you success in the even greater work that lies ahead.

And that wraps up McCain’s speech.

Lastly, I want to give you the information from McCain’s website’s page about health care, which essentially outlines the plan that he laid out in the above speech:

Straight Talk on Health System Reform
A Call to Action
Today, In Florida, John McCain Outlined His Plan For Health Care Reform.
John McCain believes we can and must provide access to health care for every American. He has proposed a comprehensive vision for achieving that. For too long, our nation’s leaders have talked about reforming health care. Now is the time to act.

  • Americans Are Worried About Health Care Costs.The problems with health care are well known: it is too expensive and 47 million people living in the United States lack health insurance.

John McCain's Vision for Health Care Reform
John McCain Believes The Key To Health Care Reform Is To Restore Control To The Patients Themselves.
We want a system of health care in which everyone can afford and acquire the treatment and preventative care they need. Health care should be available to all and not limited by where you work or how much you make. Families should be in charge of their health care dollars and have more control over care.

Making Health Insurance Innovative, Portable and Affordable
John McCain Will Reform Health Care Making It Easier For Individuals And Families To Obtain Insurance.
An important part of his plan is to use competition to improve the quality of health insurance with greater variety to match people’s needs, lower prices, and portability. Families should be able to purchase health insurance nationwide, across state lines.
McCain EventJohn McCain Will Reform The Tax Code To Offer More Choices Beyond Employer-Based Health Insurance Coverage. While still having the option of employer-based coverage, every family will also have the option of receiving a direct refundable tax crediteffectively cash – of $2,500 for individuals and $5,000 for families to offset the cost of insurance. Families will be able to choose the insurance provider that suits them best and the money would be sent directly to the insurance provider. Those obtaining innovative insurance that costs less than the credit can deposit the remainder in expanded Health Savings Accounts.
 
John McCain Proposes Making Insurance More Portable. Americans need insurance that follows them from job to job. They want insurance that is still there if they retire early and does not change if they take a few years off to raise the kids.
 
 

 

 

John McCain Will Encourage And Expand The Benefits Of Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) For Families. When families are informed about medical choices, they are more capable of making their own decisions and often decide against unnecessary options. Health Savings Accounts take an important step in the direction of putting families in charge of what they pay for.
Ensuring Care for Higher Risk Patients
John McCain’s Plan Cares For The Traditionally Uninsurable.
John McCain understands that those without prior group coverage and those with pre-existing conditions have the most difficulty on the individual market, and we need to make sure they get the high-quality coverage they need.
John McCain Will Work With States To Establish A Guaranteed Access Plan. As President, John McCain will work with governors to develop a best practice model that states can follow - a Guaranteed Access Plan or GAP – that would reflect the best experience of the states to ensure these patients have access to health coverage. One approach would establish a nonprofit corporation that would contract with insurers to cover patients who have been denied insurance and could join with other state plans to enlarge pools and lower overhead costs. There would be reasonable limits on premiums, and assistance would be available for Americans below a certain income level.
 
John McCain Will Promote Proper Incentives. John McCain will work with Congress, the governors, and industry to make sure this approach is funded adequately and has the right incentives to reduce costs such as disease management, individual case management, and health and wellness programs.
 

 

 

 

Lowering Health Care Costs
John McCain Proposes A Number Of Initiatives That Can Lower Health Care Costs. If we act today, we can lower health care costs for families through common-sense initiatives. Within a decade, health spending will comprise twenty percent of our economy. This is taking an increasing toll on America’s families and small businesses. Even Senators Clinton and Obama recognize the pressure skyrocketing health costs place on small business when they exempt small businesses from their employer mandate plans.
 
 
 
 
 

 

  • CHEAPER DRUGS: Lowering Drug Prices. John McCain will look to bring greater competition to our drug markets through safe re-importation of drugs and faster introduction of generic drugs.
  • CHRONIC DISEASE: Providing Quality, Cheaper Care For Chronic Disease. Chronic conditions account for three-quarters of the nation’s annual health care bill. By emphasizing prevention, early intervention, healthy habits, new treatment models, new public health infrastructure and the use of information technology, we can reduce health care costs. We should dedicate more federal research to caring and curing chronic disease.
  • COORDINATED CARE: Promoting Coordinated Care. Coordinated care – with providers collaborating to produce the best health care – offers better outcomes at lower cost. We should pay a single bill for high-quality disease care which will make every single provider accountable and responsive to the patients’ needs. McCain Event
  • GREATER ACCESS AND CONVENIENCE: Expanding Access To Health Care. Families place a high value on quickly getting simple care. Government should promote greater access through walk-in clinics in retail outlets.
  • INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY: Greater Use Of Information Technology To Reduce Costs. We should promote the rapid deployment of 21st century information systems and technology that allows doctors to practice across state lines.
  • MEDICAID AND MEDICARE: Reforming The Payment System To Cut Costs. We must reform the payment systems in Medicaid and Medicare to compensate providers for diagnosis, prevention and care coordination. Medicaid and Medicare should not pay for preventable medical errors or mismanagement.
  • SMOKING: Promoting The Availability Of Smoking Cessation Programs. Most smokers would love to quit but find it hard to do so. Working with business and insurance companies to promote availability, we can improve lives and reduce chronic disease through smoking cessation programs.
  • STATE FLEXIBILITY: Encouraging States To Lower Costs. States should have the flexibility to experiment with alternative forms of access, coordinated payments per episode covered under Medicaid, use of private insurance in Medicaid, alternative insurance policies and different licensing schemes for providers.
  • TORT REFORM: Passing Medical Liability Reform. We must pass medical liability reform that eliminates lawsuits directed at doctors who follow clinical guidelines and adhere to safety protocols. Every patient should have access to legal remedies in cases of bad medical practice but that should not be an invitation to endless, frivolous lawsuits.
  • TRANSPARENCY: Bringing Transparency To Health Care Costs. We must make public more information on treatment options and doctor records, and require transparency regarding medical outcomes, quality of care, costs and prices. We must also facilitate the development of national standards for measuring and recording treatments and outcomes.

Confronting the Long Term Care Challenge
John McCain Will Develop A Strategy For Meeting The Challenge Of A Population Needing Greater Long-Term Care. There have been a variety of state-based experiments such as Cash and Counseling or The Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) that are pioneering approaches for delivering care to people in a home setting. Seniors are given a monthly stipend which they can use to: hire workers and purchase care-related services and goods. They can get help managing their care by designating representatives, such as relatives or friends, to help make decisions. It also offers counseling and bookkeeping services to assist consumers in handling their programmatic responsibilities.

Covering Those With Pre-Existing Conditions
MYTH: Some Claim That Under John McCain’s Plan, Those With Pre-Existing Conditions Would Be Denied Insurance.
 
 
 
 
 

 

  • FACT: John McCain Supported The Health Insurance Portability And Accountability Act In 1996 That Took The Important Step Of Providing Some Protection Against Exclusion Of Pre-Existing Conditions.
  • FACT: Nothing In John McCain’s Plan Changes The Fact That If You Are Employed And Insured You Will Build Protection Against The Cost Of Any Pre-Existing Condition.
  • FACT: As President, John McCain Would Work With Governors To Find The Solutions Necessary To Ensure Those With Pre-Existing Conditions Are Able To Easily Access Care.
 

And there you have McCain’s health care plan.  I don’t like all of it, but I really do like that fact that he’s coming at this from an innovative way, not just paying for it like the Democrats want to do, but allowing for more competition between health care providers.  I think his plan is much better than any plan that the Democrats have outlined.

Done Analyzing,

Ranting Republican
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Howard Dean: “We’ll Know Who Our Nominee Is” by the “End of June”

April 28, 2008

Today, Democratic National Committee Chairman and former Vermont Governor Howard Dean appeared on MSNBC’s Today Show, where he was interviewed by Meredith Vieira.  He discussed the current situation between Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton as well as what role the Superdelegates will play in the nomination process.  The following is a video of the interview, and I have typed a transcript below it:

 

Meredith Vieira: Howard Dean is the Chairman of the Democratic National Committee and former Governor of the State of Vermont.  Doctor Dean, good morning to you.

Dean: Thanks for having me on.

Meredith: Thanks for being here.  You just heard that Reverend Wright is making headlines again.  How much does he complicate your efforts to eventually bring this party together?

Dean: Well, you know, I—I’ve made it a point not to comment on either of the campaigns, so I’m not gonna comment on Reverend Wright, which is all about—in this campaign.  My focus is John McCain.  Uh—John McCain wants to stay in Iraq for 100 years.  He thinks the economy is the problem of the mortgage holders, and not the mortgage lenders.  Uh—he thinks that we ought not to have health care for our kids.  Uh—there’s a big difference between both Hillary—Clinton and Barack Obama.  On the one hand and John McCain on the other, so I—I’m not gonna get into the Obama versus Clinton stuff.

Meredith: But race has certainly become a key element in—in this campaign, on both sides.  You can’t ignore that.

Dean: I—I’m not totally convinced that it is a key element, uh—[unintelligible].  I think that people make up their minds on a variety of issues and I think they’ll continue to do that.  But again, I—there’s a big—the biggest difference on this campaign is not between Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama.  It’s between John McCain, who’s a candidate of the past, a candidate that offers us four more of George Bush—uh—and either of our two candidates, who are really gonna be agents of change.

Meredith: But first you have to have somebody nominated, and you’re hoping to see this nomination wrapped up by June.  How optimistic are you that that will happen?

Dean: I think it will happen.  Um—I think—we—we got nine more primaries.  I think we’re gonna get through those.  Uh—we’ve got two really big ones coming up a week from tomorrow.  Uh—and then—uh—the—there’s 500 of the 800 unpledged delegates have already said who they’re for.  I think the remaining 300 will do that by the end of June and we’ll know who our nominee is, and that’s what we need to do.

Meredith: But if you listen to Senators Clinton and Obama over the past few days, they’ve been arguing over what criteria the Superdelegates should use to make their selection, and Clinton is suggesting that it’s the person who has the most votes, popular votes, and she has those if you count Michigan and Florida.  Barack Obama is saying, “No, no, no, it’s the person who has the most pledged delegates.”  But if I understand the rules right, the Superdelegates don’t have to abide by any of those criteria.

Dean: Uh—the—the rules say that the delegates can vote their conscience, and they—they’re Superdelegates—and they will vote their conscience.  Most of the time, and in fact, all of the time in my personal experience, they have voted for the person with the most pledged delegates, but there’s—that’s not in the rules, and they can do—I—I think what they’re gonna do is vote for the person they think can beat John McCain.  Look, we’ve just got a new ad out on the—on McCain’s position on the war.  It’s so far away from where Americans want to be, that I just can’t imagine how they’re gonna elect John McCain.  The only way that John McCain wins this race is if Democrats are not united.  We need to be united in order to win.  We need a new direction for this country, and again, John McCain offers the—the past.

Meredith: But right now you are not united, sir, that’s very clear.

Dean: Well, we’ve got a race going on, and as soon as we finish that race, we’ll be united.

Meredith: But what—what—you—you talked about the Superdelegates following the will of the pledged delegates.  If they don’t do that this time, and as you said, they don’t have to, there is the possibility of a perception that the race was stolen.  How do you ensure that it was not, to the person who loses?  How do you ensure that it was fair?

Dean: That’s exactly what I’m doing.  I stand up for what the rules of the party are.  You may or may not like the rules, but both candidates knew what the rules were when we started—uh—they both have campaigns among pledged and unpledged delegates, and my job is to uphold the rules—without fear or favor of any candidates.  Look, somebody’s gonna lose this race with 49% of the delegates.  We can’t win the Presidency without those 49% that represent the candidate that doesn’t win.  And so, I need to make sure that whoever loses feels that they’ve been treated fairly and respectfully, and that’s what my—that’s my job and that’s what I’m gonna do.

Meredith: Have you spoken to the two candidates, taken them aside, and said, “Look [unintelligible] if you lose, I expect you to go out there and campaign vigorously,” for the other one?

Dean: I don’t think I need to do that.  Look, when I lost to John Kerry, I didn’t need to be told that this was about something that was greater than—than me, this was about the country.  And I worked very hard for John Kerry, and it took me about three months to get my folks to change their position and not support me, but support John Kerry for the Presidency, because it was about what was good for America, and I think either of these candidates are experienced public servants and they know, without being told by me or anybody else, that their obligation is to their country, and I think that they will do that very thing.  As soon as they know that they aren’t gonna win, they’re gonna support the other candidate.

Meredith: Alright, Howard Dean, thank you very much.

Dean: Thank you.

Now, let’s look at some parts of Dean’s interview.

First, I have to clarify a statement that Dean made:

Uh—John McCain wants to stay in Iraq for 100 years.  He thinks the economy is the problem of the mortgage holders, and not the mortgage lenders.  Uh—he thinks that we ought not to have health care for our kids.

Yeah, that’s blatantly untrue.  Nowhere has McCain said that he WANTS to spend 100 years in Iraq, but that we should stay there that long if necessary.  He never said that we shouldn’t have health care for kids, but that the government shouldn’t be buying health care plans for them.

Meredith: But race has certainly become a key element in—in this campaign, on both sides.  You can’t ignore that.

Dean: I—I’m not totally convinced that it is a key element, uh—[unintelligible].  I think that people make up their minds on a variety of issues and I think they’ll continue to do that.

Dean, buddy, where’ve you been?  Of course race is a key element – this is America.  It’ll be a key element for another 50-100 years.

Meredith: But first you have to have somebody nominated, and you’re hoping to see this nomination wrapped up by June.  How optimistic are you that that will happen?

Dean: I think it will happen.  Um—I think—we—we got nine more primaries.  I think we’re gonna get through those.  Uh—we’ve got two really big ones coming up a week from tomorrow.  Uh—and then—uh—the—there’s 500 of the 800 unpledged delegates have already said who they’re for.  I think the remaining 300 will do that by the end of June and we’ll know who our nominee is, and that’s what we need to do.

I honestly don’t see Clinton as giving up by then.  If she’s behind, she’ll take it to the convention floor and fight for every last delegate to come over to her side.  The only way she’ll win it is if Florida and Michigan are seated, and Obama wouldn’t allow that, and even if he did, his supporters wouldn’t, and the future of the Democratic party would be bleak at best for the next 20+ years.

Meredith: But what—what—you—you talked about the Superdelegates following the will of the pledged delegates.  If they don’t do that this time, and as you said, they don’t have to, there is the possibility of a perception that the race was stolen.  How do you ensure that it was not, to the person who loses?  How do you ensure that it was fair?

Dean: That’s exactly what I’m doing.  I stand up for what the rules of the party are.  You may or may not like the rules, but both candidates knew what the rules were when we started—uh—they both have campaigns among pledged and unpledged delegates, and my job is to uphold the rules—without fear or favor of any candidates.  Look, somebody’s gonna lose this race with 49% of the delegates.  We can’t win the Presidency without those 49% that represent the candidate that doesn’t win.  And so, I need to make sure that whoever loses feels that they’ve been treated fairly and respectfully, and that’s what my—that’s my job and that’s what I’m gonna do.

Right on.  If the Democrats don’t unite (and they won’t!!!) it pretty much gurantees McCain the win.

Meredith: Have you spoken to the two candidates, taken them aside, and said, “Look [unintelligible] if you lose, I expect you to go out there and campaign vigorously,” for the other one?

Dean: I don’t think I need to do that.  Look, when I lost to John Kerry, I didn’t need to be told that this was about something that was greater than—than me, this was about the country.  And I worked very hard for John Kerry, and it took me about three months to get my folks to change their position and not support me, but support John Kerry for the Presidency, because it was about what was good for America, and I think either of these candidates are experienced public servants and they know, without being told by me or anybody else, that their obligation is to their country, and I think that they will do that very thing.  As soon as they know that they aren’t gonna win, they’re gonna support the other candidate.

But you and Kerry didn’t fight NEARLY as much as Obama and Clinton are.  And you and Kerry didn’t go through all of the primaries before you knew who the nominee was.  The two are VERY different, and althouigh the 2 candidates may APPEAR to get along, they won’t, and Americans will see this.  In addition, the supporters of the loser won’t all go over to the other side, and many of them will stay home, ESPECIALLY if Obama loses.  All those young people who got involved will suddenly become apathetic again.

I honestly wonder if Dean really believes what he’s saying, whether or not he truly believes that everything will work out alright.

Frankly, I don’t see how the Democrats could pull off a win, unless the Republicans and/or McCain screw up big before November (Mark Foley, George Allen, etc…).

Done Ranting,

Ranting Republican
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The Michigan Young Republicans Have Officially Returned

April 28, 2008

Yesterday, I had the privilege to attend the Michigan Young Republicans’ Kick-Off Party (I was finally able to meet Oakland County Executive L. Brooks Patterson the Great).  It was a lot of fun.  I met a lot of new people and saw some friends that I hadn’t seen in a while.

But the best thing about it was the turnout.  We had Representative Joe Knollenberg and L. Brooks Patterson there, as well as Michigan Representative Marty Knollenberg and quite a few others.

The group launched its website the same day: www.michiganyr.com.  Go check it out.

So far, we have groups chartered in:

  • Ingham County
  • Genessee County
  • Kalamazoo County
  • Kent County
  • Macomb County
  • Oakland County
  • Washtenaw County
  • Wayne County

This is really a great organization to be in.  I was one of the ones who helped start the Wayne County group (under the great leadership of our current Chair, Angelique Rea), and our group has grown nicely in just under a year.

If you’re in one of those 8 counties, I’d highly recommend checking out your local group, and if you’re not, start your own.  The group really is a great way to get involved and meet a lot of nice Republicans.

Done Pitching,

Ranting Republican
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Obama Launches Preliminaries for General Election Campaign

April 26, 2008

Yesterday, Barack Obama released the following announcement on his website:

Today, we announce the Vote for Change drive, an unprecedented 50-state voter registration and mobilization drive, in which we will bring thousands of new people into the political process.On May 10th, there will be voter registration events in all 50 states. Click on the map below to find an event in your area and bring new voters into our democracy… 

Voter registration and expanding participation in the process is more than a campaign strategy; it’s a vital part of Barack’s identity.

When Obama graduated from Harvard Law School, he could have taken a high paying job at a private law firm, but instead, he chose to return to Chicago and run a voter registration drive that brought thousands of new voters into the process and changed Illinois’ politics.

Watch the video detailing Obama’s work with Project Vote…

“If we’re going to push back on the special interests and finally solve the challenges we face, we’re going to need everyone to get involved,” said Senator Obama. “Over the next six months, Vote for Change is going to bring new participants into the process, adding scores of new voices to this critical dialogue about our future. I started my career as a community organizer, and I worked to register voters in communities where hope was all but lost. I’ve seen what can happen when Americans re-engage and take ownership in the process.”

Find a voter registration event in your neck of the woods at My.BarackObama.com/voteforchange

And if you want to take an active role in the campaign all summer, apply for the Obama Organizing Fellowship today. Watch this video intro from Barack and apply…

This campaign has never been about one person, but about all of us working together for a new kind of politics, a stronger democracy, and a better future for our country. It is premised on the idea that we are all better off when we take a stake in each other’s lives. 

Our campaign’s recent voter registration drives have registered more than 200,000 new Democrats in Pennsylvania, more than 115,000 new Democrats in North Carolina, and more than 150,000 new Democrats in Indiana. Those numbers just scratch the surface of what’s possible.

 “We’ve already seen amazing new enthusiasm and involvement over the course of this campaign, and now we’re taking that excitement to the next level in all 50 states,” said deputy campaign manager Steve Hildebrand. “We’ve seen too many elections where turnout was less than 50 percent. At this critical time in our history, we know we can do better—this year and beyond.”

So, this is the beginning of Obama preparing to become the nominee.  Although not an official statement, it appears that Obama is planning on becoming the nominee, and this is his way of preparing to launch a general election campaign.  I mean, I think it’s pretty well known that Clinton has almost no chance of winning, but I still think it’d be funny if this came to haunt him and he lost the nomination.  And that would pretty much guarantee the win for John McCain come November.

Done Ranting,

Ranting Republican
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Obama Won’t Take Money from Oil Companies, but He Will Take It from Their Executives

April 24, 2008

After airing a commercial saying that he would not take money from oil companies (which doesn’t make much sense, since he LEGALLY CAN’T under the 1907 Tillman Act!), it has come out that he has been taking money from their executives.

Here’s a video of the ad, with a transcript below it:

Since the gas lines of the ’70s, Democrats and Republicans have talked about energy independence, but nothing’s changed — except now Exxon’s making $40 billion a year, and we’re paying $3.50 for gas.  I’m Barack Obama.  I don’t take money from oil companies or Washington lobbyists, and I won’t let them block change anymore.  They’ll pay a penalty on windfall profits. We’ll invest in alternative energy, create jobs and free ourselves from foreign oil.  I approve this message because it’s time that Washington worked for you.  Not them.

So, as I said, under the Tillman Act, which Congress passed back in 1907, corporations can’t donate money, but their executives can.  So far, a total of $263,000 from oil company executives, family members, and employees has been donated to the Obama campaign since he entered the race.  $140,000 has been from contributions of $1,000 – $2,300, the maximum contribution allowed under federal law.

Now, did he lie in his ad?  No.  But I guarantee to you that if McCain took a contribution from the Imperial Wizard or even a Grand Dragon of the Ku Klux Klan, you’d have the Obama camp calling the race card and he’d be screaming his head off.

This just goes to show you that Obama is not this innocent “I want change from the Washington politicians” guy that he says he is.  He is manipulative and a Democrat – oh wait, that was redundant.

Done Ranting,

Ranting Republican
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Update on My Laptop Situation

April 24, 2008

It appears as if my computer is now working better.  I’m still having some problems, but it’s not as bad as before.  I plan on posting as usual, but if I drop off the face of the planet for a while, you’ll know what happened.

~~Ranting Republican

Indefinite Leave of Absence

April 23, 2008

As of now, my laptop is acting up severely, and my virus scan is not working, so I’m fearing that I may have a virus.  I’ll try to fix the problem as soon as possible, but I may not have anything up for a while.

~~Ranting Republican

A Look at the Michigan Ballot for 2008: Proposals: Marijuana, Stem Cells, the Senate, Health Care, Taxes, and More

April 23, 2008

**I know that a lot of people are finding this page from search engine searches, but I just wanted to let you know that this blog post is severely out of date.  I have 3 updates about the proposals that I’ve put out since I did this one.  The first is a general summary of the proposals that made it on the ballot.  The second is a post about the medicinal marijuana proposal.  And the third is on the stem cell research proposal.**

Originally, I was just going to do this in one blog post, but I realized that my views on one proposal alone are going to be incredibly long, so today, I am just going to introduce the proposals that might be on the ballot this November.  The following document was put out by the Secretary of State on April 14, 2008:

STATE OF MICHIGAN

STATEWIDE BALLOT PROPOSAL STATUS

NOVEMBER 4, 2008 GENERAL ELECTION

 

I. STATEWIDE PROPOSALS QUALIFIED TO APPEAR ON NOVEMBER 4, 2008 GENERAL ELECTION BALLOT

 

A. COALITION FOR COMPASSIONATE CARE: Initiative petition approved as to form June 6, 2007; signatures filed November 20, 2007; petition determined sufficient March 3, 2008; proposal language certified to State Legislature March 3, 2008; 40-day consideration period reserved for State Legislature elapsed April 12, 2008.

Purpose: Legislative initiative to allow under state law the medical use of marihuana.

Contact: Michigan Coalition for Compassionate Care, P.O. Box 20489, Ferndale, MI 48220. Dianne Byrum (517) 333-1606.

 

II. LEGISLATIVE PROPOSALS CURRENTLY PENDING BEFORE STATE LEGISLATURE

None at this date.

 

 

III. STATEWIDE PROPOSAL PETITIONS CURRENTLY BEING REVIEWED FOR SUFFICIENCY

None at this date.

 

IV. STATEWIDE PROPOSAL PETITIONS “APPROVED AS TO FORM” IN PREPARATION FOR CIRCULATION

 

A. MEDICAL AND RECREATIONAL PEACE: Initiative petition approved as to form November 27, 2006.

Purpose: Legislative initiative to permit anyone 18 and over to use cannabis on private property; provide penalties for the use of cannabis in public areas; and permit cultivation of cannabis on residential properties.

 

Contact: Medical and Recreational Peace, P.O. Box 102, Eaton Rapids, MI 48827-0102.

 

B. HEALTH CARE FOR MICHIGAN: Initiative petition approved as to form December 20, 2007.

Purpose: Proposed constitutional amendment to require the State Legislature to pass laws to ensure that “every Michigan resident has affordable and comprehensive health care coverage through a fair and cost-effective financing system.”

Contact: Health Care for Michigan, 28342 Dartmouth Street, Madison Heights, Michigan 48071. Gary Benjamin (313) 964-4130 Ext. 229.

 

C. PART-TIME LEGISLATURE: Initiative petition approved as to form December 20, 2007.

Purpose: Proposed constitutional amendment to provide for a part-time legislature, reduce legislative salaries and limit legislative benefits.

Contact: Part-time Legislature Ballot Question Committee, 1840 North Michigan #200, Saginaw, Michigan 48602. Gregory C. Schmid (989) 799-4641. Website: <www.PartTimeLegislature.com>.

 

D. PEOPLE’S CHOICE TAX REPEAL: Initiative petition approved as to form February 4, 2008.

Purpose: Proposed constitutional amendment to require a statewide vote on any state statute that creates a new tax, continues a tax, reduces a tax deduction or tax credit or increases the effective rate or base of a tax. The proposed amendment would also extend initiative and referendum petition sponsors certain new petition design and circulation allowances.

Contact: People’s Choice Tax Repeal Committee, 1840 North Michigan #200, Saginaw, Michigan 48602. Gregory C. Schmid (989) 799-4641. Website: <www.TaxRepeal.com>.

 

E. STEM CELL RESEARCH: Initiative petition approved as to form February 4, 2008.

Purpose: Proposed constitutional amendment to permit with certain limitations stem cell research in Michigan.

Contact: Stem Cell Research BQC, P.O. Box 20216, Lansing, Michigan 48901. Mark Burton (517) 974-4004.

 

F. MICHIGAN FAIR TAX: Initiative petition approved as to form February 4, 2008.

Purpose: Proposed constitutional amendment to eliminate the Michigan Income Tax and the Michigan Business Tax and replace those taxes with a sales tax.

Contact: Michigan Fair Tax Proposal Committee, 352 12th Street, Plainwell, Michigan 49080. Micah Kissling (800) 314-6483.

 

G. TURN MICHIGAN AROUND: Initiative petition approved as to form February 4, 2008.

Purpose: Proposed constitutional amendment to provide for a part-time legislature.

Contact: Committee to Turn Michigan Around, 346 West Michigan Avenue, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49007-3737. Steward Sandstrom (269) 381-4000.

 

H. PROPORTIONAL SENATE: Initiative petition approved as to form February 4, 2008.

 

 

Purpose: Proposed constitutional amendment to stipulate that the State Senate “shall consist of 50 members to be elected off of candidate lists at large from a statewide election.”

Contact: Proportional Senate Committee, 13423 Agnes Street, Southgate, Michigan 48195. Timothy Kachinski (734) 775-1810. Website: <www.myspace.com/proportionalsenate> Email: <proportional senate@hotmail.com>

 

I. PERSONAL EDUCATION ACCOUNT: Initiative petition approved as to form February 4, 2008.

Purpose: Proposed constitutional amendment to require the State Legislature to “provide from 4 years of age until the age of 18 years every resident child in Michigan with funding to support education on a per pupil basis which shall be controlled by the parent(s) or legal guardian(s) of each child respectively….”

Contact: Personal Education Account Committee, 13423 Agnes Street, Southgate, Michigan 48195 Timothy Kachinski (734) 775-1810. Website: <www.myspace.com/peainitiative> Email: <peainitiative@hotmail.com>

 

 

V. STATEWIDE PROPOSAL PETITIONS SUBMITTED FOR “APPROVAL AS TO FORM”

None at this date.

So, we have one that will definitely be on the ballot, to legalize medicinal marihuana, then we have 9 that might make it on the ballot: one to legalize all cannabis (marijuana/marihuana), one to provide health care, two for a part time legislature, one to require voters to approve tax increases, one to legalize stem cell research, one to make a Fair Tax, one to make the Senate at large instead of by districts, and one to provide funding to children for education.

I will now begin to give you my opinion on each of these proposals, proposal-by-proposal.  My goal is to get out a new post each day, but this may not happen, as I am entering exam week.

Done Reporting,

Ranting Republican
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Pennsylvania Primary Results – 1:00 A.M. – Clinton & McCain Won

April 23, 2008

Here are the Pennsylvania Primary results as of 1:00 A.M. with 99% reporting.  This will be my last report for the night:

Democrats:

  1. Clinton 1,239,523 55% 52 delegates
  2. Obama 1,023,366 45% 46 delegates

Chester county is going for Obama with 75% now reporting.  Philadelphia continues to hold for Obama at 97% reporting.  Obama is also maintaining Delaware which has gone up to 97% reporting.  Allegheny (where Pittsburg is) and Bucsk (Clinton) are reporting 99%, Potter (Clinton) is at 60%, Pike (Clinton) is at 61%, and Monroe (Clinton) is at 98%.  My prediction was that Clinton will win by 10%, +2% from her previous standings, and she’s currently at +10%.  I will no longer be updating any of the counties that have reached 100%.

Republicans:

  1. McCain 574,485 73% (probably 62 delegates, but they’re technically unpledged)
  2. Paul 125,870 16%
  3. Huckabee 89,985 11%

Done Reporting,

Ranting Republican
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