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Live Analysis of the Final Presidential Debate

October 15, 2008

Alright, we’re moments away from the beginning of the debate.  As always, I’ll be watching CNN, who will have a focus group (undecided voters in Ohio) with a tracking rating of how people like what they’re hearing (broken up by men and women).  WordPress just added an option to add polls, so I’ll see if I can get that working after the debate is over and post a poll about who won.

Tonight’s debate will be moderated by Bob Schieffer (CBS’s Face the Nation).

We’re about 2 minutes away.

Schieffer: Why is your plan better than your opponents?

McCain: Thanks to everybody, my prayers go out to Nancy Reagan.  “Americans are hurting and angry.”  They’re innocent victims of greed.  “They have every reason to be angry.”  We have to have a short term fix and long term fixes.  Short term fix: Fannie and Freddie cause the sub-prime lending situation, that caused the housing market to collapse.  We need to reverse the decline in home ownership.  People need to know that they can stay in there homes.  Let’s take $300 billion of the $750 billion and buy mortgages so that people can stay in their homes.  What about people who could already afford to stay in their homes?  It’ll drive home value down if there are abandoned houses.  I didn’t like the answer (because I’m staunchly against any of the bailout), but it’ll go over well with voters, and the focus group liked it.

Obama: I think this’ll take some time to work itself out.  We need an economic package for the middle class.  The fundamentals of the economy were weak before this crisis (it depends what you’re defining fundamentals of the economy as).  Tax cut for people making less than $200,000.  Buying mortgages could be a bailout to banks, so I disagree with McCain there, but we do need to help homeowners.  Need to fix energy and health care.

McCain: Obama had an encounter with a plumber, Joe (somebody) Wurzelbacher.  Joe wants to buy the business that he’s worked in, and  he looked at Obama’s plan, and he saw that he’d be put in a higher tax bracket, and that’d cause him to not be able to employ people.  Joe, I’ll not only help you buy that business and keep your taxes low, and provide a way for you to provide health care to your employees.  You want to increase people’s taxes, like Joe the plumber’s.  And he’s right there – he’ll kill small businesses if he raises taxes.  The  focus group liked that.

Obama: McCain wants to give tax breaks to some of the wealthiest companies, including oil companies.  I want to give tax cuts to 95% of Americans.  Income tax, capital gains tax.  THAT’S A LIE ABOUT CAPITAL GAINS!!!  He wants to take capital gains taxes back to levels before Clinton lowered them!  I want to give small businesses tax breaks.  He lies here – 11.5% of Americans don’t even PAY income taxes, because they don’t make enough money!

McCain: Obama says, “We need to spread the wealth around.”  “I want Joe the plumber to spread the wealth around.”  Why would you want to raise taxes?

Obama: I want to cut taxes for 95% of Americans.  Not true!  I want to cut taxes for Joe the plumber before he was able to make $250,000.  I want to give families with kids going to college a break.  I’d prefer that nobody pay taxes, but we have to pay for the core of the economy to remain strong.

McCain: Companies will go overseas if we raise our business tax rates.  “Of all times in America, we need to cut taxes and encourage business, not spread the wealth around.”  Great answer – McCain actually did better with the focus group there than McCain, and that surprised me.

Schieffer: Talking about reducing the budget deficit.  Won’t some of the programs you’re proposing have to be trimmed or eliminated?

Obama: If the $750 billion works as it’s supposed to, taxpayers will get their money back.  I have been a strong proponent of pay-as-you-go.  Some of the cuts we’ll need are subsidies to insurance companies.  “It’s just a giveaway.”  I’ll go through the federal budget line-by-line, and eliminate what’s unnecessary.  We need to invest in the American people.  We need to prevent diseases when they’re young, so they won’t spend as much Medicare money.  The same with college – they’ll drive up the economy.  He’s getting very high ratings right now – he’s appealing to the average American people.

McCain: Back to home-ownership.  During the depression, we bought homes and home values went back up.  This was a plan that Senator Clinton proposed.  We need to become energy independent.  I need an across-the-board spending freeze.  I oppose subsidies for ethanol.  Sorry – got interrupted there.  I will veto earmarks.  Senator Obama put in an earmark for a projector in a planetarium in his hometown.

Obama: An across-the-board spending freeze is a hatchet, and we need a scalpel.  Senator McCain talks about earmarks, but they account for 0.5% of the federal budget.  Eliminating them will help, but it won’t solve the problem.  When President Bush came into office, we had a budget surplus, and now we have a deficit.  Pursuing Bush-esque budgets will worsen the situation, and McCain voted for Bush’s budgets, 4 out of 5 times.

McCain: I will give a new direction to this economy.  I’m not President Bush.  If he wanted to oppose him, he should’ve run 4 years ago.  Mayor Bloomberg just put in a spending freeze in New York, so it can be done.  I’ll eliminate spending.  Obama voted for the last 2 budgets that Bush proposed (the only 2 that came up since he’s been in office!).  I have fought against spending and special interest.  When have you stood up to your party?  He’s getting good ratings, and I really think that he’s appealing to American people.

Obama: The first major bill I voted on was against tort reform.  I support charter schools.  I support clean coal technology.  I have a history of reaching across the aisle.  If I mistaken your policies for President Bush’s policies, it’s because on the core economic issues, taxes, spending, etc…, you’ve been a supporter of President Bush.  You’re been against him on stuff like torture, and I commend that, but for the majority, you want 8 more years of the same thing.

McCain: It’s been clear that I’ve disagreed with Bush and my party: climate change, opposition to earmarks, torture, conduct of the War in Iraq, Medicare prescription drugs, HMO patients’ bill of rights.  I have stood up to my party’s leadership.

Schieffer: Both of you promised to take the high road, but both campaigns have turned nasty.

McCain: This has been a very tough campaign.  If Obama had responded to my request to do town hall meetings, like he originally said, the tone of this campaign could’ve been better.  The tone of this campaign has taken a nasty turn.  I apologize for some of the negativity that has come out of my campaign.  I hope OBama will repudiate the remarks made by Congressman John Lewis.  Obama didn’t keep his word about taking public financing.  He’s getting high ratings from men here, but average ratings from women.

Obama: 2/3 of the American people think McCain’s running a negative campaign, versus 1/3 of the American people thinking that of mine.  100% of your ads have been negative (BULL CRAP!).  There’s nothing wrong with having a vigorous debate like we’re having now, but not having town hall meetings doesn’t justify the ads that have come out from your campaign and 527s.  I don’t mind being attacked for 3 weeks, but we can’t afford 4 more years of failed economic policies.  He’s actually getting negative ratings from women, and average from men here.  He’s really attacking McCain during a question about negativity in campaigns, and I think he’s really making himself look bad here.

McCain: If you turn on the television, every other ad was an attack ad on my health care policy, saying that I oppose federal funding for stem cells.  I don’t.  Obama is spending unprecedented amounts of money in negative attack ads on me.  Of course we’re talking about Joe the plumber and restoring jobs to America.  That’s what my campaign is all about.  Again, I didn’t hear a repudiation of Congressman Lewis.

Obama: Lewis, made a statement with what he was troubled with hearing some of the rallies that your running mate was holding.  People were yelling “terrorist” and “kill him,” and your running mate didn’t stop them.  I do think that he gave a good comparison between what’s happening now and the civil right’s movement.  What the Americans want is for us to focus on the challenges that we have now.  We have serious differences on health care.  When people bring up me being with terrorists, that’s not the issues.

McCain: Whenever you have big rallies, you’ll have fringe people, and that’s not appropriate.  But for the majority of people, they’re not saying anything negative.  These people are the most patriotic people in this nation (veterans and wives of veterans).  There’ve been thingsat your rallies that I’m not happy with either.  I have always repudiated out of line statements, and I will continue to do that, but we cannot stand for the things that have been going on.  I haven’t.

Schieffer: Do you take issue with that?

Obama: What I think is most important is that we recognize that in order to solve 2 wars, a financial crisis, creating jobs, then we all need to be able to work together.  “We need to disagree without being disagreeable.  What we can’t do is try to characterize each other as bad people.”

McCain: We need to know the full extent of Obama’s relationships with Ayers and ACORN.  If there’s nothing there, I don’t care about it, but we need to know what all went on there.

Obama: Mr. Ayers has become the centerpiece of McCain’s campaign.  Bill Ayers is a professor in Chicago.  40 years ago, he engaged in despicable acts.  “I have … condemned those acts.”  I served on a school board with him 10 years ago.  “Mr. Ayers is not involved in my campaign … and he will not advise me in the White House.”  ACORN: Apparently, they were paying people to get people registered to vote.  The only thing I did with them was represent them with some thing in Illinois – I didn’t catch it all.  I associate with Warren Buffet on economics.  On foreign policy, it’s Joe Biden or Dick Lugar, or General Jim Jones.  “Those are the people who have shaped my ideas and will be surrounding me in the White House.”

McCain: While you and Ayers were on that board, you gave money to ACORN, and you launched your campaign from Ayers living room.  In 2001, he said he’d wished he’d have bombed more.  We need to know all the details here.  And my (not McCain) view is that with Ayers – it’s no big deal if Obama’s honest.  With ACORN, there are some serious problems there – ACORN has supported Obama, and Obama has supported ACORN, and ACORN has shown to have some serious legal problems.

Schieffer: Why is your running mate better than his?

Obama: He’s been there a while – he knows what he’s doing, especially when it comes to foreign policy.  Biden has never forgotten where he came from.  He fights for the little guy.  He has always been fighting for working families.  “After 8 years of failed policies [we] will have to reprioritize … give tax cuts to small businesses … and individuals who are struggling.”  We need to become energy independent, and make sure that our kids afford can go to college.  Biden has always been on the right side of the issues.

McCain: Palin is a reformer.  She took on the old governor, who was part of her party.  She’s given money back to taxpayers and cut the size of the government.  “She is a reformer through and through, and it’s time that we have that breath of fresh air and sweep out” the old politics of Washington.  “She understand special needs families, and understands that autism is on the rise.”  She has united people all over America, and I’m proud of her.

Schieffer: Is she qualified to be President?

Obama: That’ll be up to the American people to decide.  Her work on special needs kids has been commendable.  He didn’t answer the question!  If we have an across-the-board spending freeze, special needs kids will suffer.

McCain (on Biden): Biden is experienced, but he’s had some bad foreign policy ideas, such as dividing Iraq into different countries, and we’ve seen Iraq become united as one country.  Every time Obama says we need to spend more.  Why can’t we have transparency of these government organizations.

Schieffer: Energy and climate control.  Presidents have said that we need to reduce our dependency on foreign oil.  Give us a number of how much you believe we can reduce foreign oil during your first term.

McCain: We can eliminate our dependence on Middle East countries and Venezuela.  Canadian oil is fine.  We need nuclear power plants, and that’ll be how we eliminate those 2 sources of foreign oil.  We need wind, tide, solar, gas, clean coal.  He’s getting huge ratings, and for good reason – it’s a good energy plan.  Especially the nuclear part!!!!

Obama: In 10 years, we can reduce our dependence so we don’t have to import oil from the Middle East or Venezuela.  “Nothing is more important than us borrowing … money from China and sending it to Venezuela.”  We need to expand domestic production, by telling oil companies, “Use them or lose them” in terms of oil fields being leased here in the U.S.  We need to drill offshore, but that won’t solve the problem.  We need wind, solar, biofuel.  We need efficient cars built here in America, not in Japan.  And he’s got good ideas too, but I WISH he would’ve said he wants nuclear power – nuclear power is safe (we use it on subs) and VERY efficient.  NAFTA didn’t have enforceable environmental agreements, and we should’ve included those.  When it comes to South Korea, we have an agreement with them, and they’re sending more cars here than we are to them.  That’s not free trade.

McCain: “Obama said, ‘We will look at offshore drilling.’  Did you catch that?  ‘Look at.'”  We need to do more than look at it, we need to do it.  AGREED!  Our businesses are paying money into Columbia, but because of previous agreements, they’re getting their goods into here for free.  We need a free trade agreement with Columbia, which Obama has opposed.  Obama hasn’t even travelled down there, and he doesn’t understand Columbia.

Obama: I understand it.  Labor leaders have been persecuted, and we need to stand for human rights.  Workers who are trying to organize for rights shouldn’t be persecuted, and that’s why I supported a free trade agreement with Peru.  When I talked about automakers, they’re getting hammered right now, not only because of gas prices, but with the financial crisis.  People can’t get car loans, so we need to get loan guarantees.  We need more efficient cars and cars of the future.  That’ll help create new jobs.  He’s getting VERY high ratings – he’s maxed out with women, and men are rating him high too.

McCain: Obama doesn’t want a free trade agreement with our best ally in the region, but wants to sit down with Hugo Chavez without preconditions.  Jobs and businesses will be created if we open up those markets.  Obama wants to restrict trade and raise taxes, and the last President who did that was Hoover.  We went from a deep recession to a depression.  I won’t let that happen.

Schieffer: Would you first lower health care costs, instead of providing more health care?

Obama: We need to do both.  My plan will allow you to keep your plan if you have health insurance.  We will lower costs so that cost savings are brought back to you.  If you don’t have insurance, you can buy into the same kind of federal pool that federal employees enjoy.  Insurance companies won’t be able to discriminate against people with preconditions.  Drugs will be lower, and we need to look at preventative care.  This will require more money up front, but will lower costs in the long run.  VERY high ratings at the end there.

McCain: Premiums and copays are going up, and health care costs are going up and inflicting pain on Americans.  We need walk in clinics and community health care centers.  We need nutrition and physical fitness programs in schools to keep kids healthy.  I want to give all American families a $5,000 tax credit.  Under Obama’s plan, if you have employees and they have kids, if you don’t have a health care plan, Obama will fine you.  I still haven’t heard what that fine will be.

Obama: Your fine will be $0.  I exempt small businesses for the requirement that large businesses have to provide health care.  Well, Senator Obama, what do you consider a small business???  The average family is paying higher premiums because of the uninsured.  I’ll give small businesses a 50% credit so they can afford it.  If not, you can buy into the plan I have.  McCain will give you the tax credit, but what will happen to older folks who can’t afford the health care plan?  McCain will tax the health care benefits you have from your employer, the first time in history this has ever happened.  Insurers right now are restricted statewide.  Those rules would be stripped away, and you’d see companies excluding people.

McCain: People like Joe are rich, because Obama said about him that we need to “spread the wealth,” so he’s rich enough that he would be fined.  Under my plan, people will be able to go across the country, giving them the chance to choose their futures.  “Senator Government–Senator Obama wants government to do the job.”  Senator Obama and the Democrats have been in charge the last 2 years, and things have gotten worse.

Obama: Under McCain’s plan, there’s a strong risk that you will lose your health care from your employer.  All I want to do is lower costs.

Schieffer: Could either of you nominate a Supreme Court Justice who disagrees with your view on Roe v. Wade.

McCain: I have never had a litmus test.  I think the Court decided incorrectly there, but I’m a Federalist – it should be left up to the states.  We need to nominate people based on qualifications, not if I agree with their ideology.  There should be no litmus test.  These nominees should be picked based on qualifications, who adhere to the Constitution, not people who legislate from the bench.  (But people who stick to the Constitution would oppose Roe v. Wade).  I’ll have no litmus test.

Obama: I’d agree that we shouldn’t have a litmus test.  Fairness and justice should be given to the American people.  It’s very likely that one of us will be making 1 or more appointments, and Roe v. Wade hangs in the balance.  I support the decision in Roe v. Wade.  I believe that women are in the best position to make this decision.  The Constitution has privacy built into it that shouldn’t be subject to state referendum or popular vote.  “I will look for those judges who have an outstanding record … intellect.”  McCain and I disagreed when the S.C. made it harder for some woman to bring suit for equal pay for women.  The Court said that she waited too long.  If a woman is being treated unfairly, the Court needs to stand up if nobody will.

McCain: You can’t waive the statute of limitation 20 to 30 years.  Senator Obama, as a member of the Illinois State Senate voted in the Judiciary Committee against a law that would provide medical attention to babies who were not successfully aborted (essentially passive infanticide).  Then he voted present on the floor.  He did the same with partial birth abortion.  Men are liking this, but women not so much.

Obama: That’s not true.  There was a bill put forward that said that you need life saving treatment that would undermine Roe v. Wade, but there was a law alreay on the books.  On partial birth abortion: I’m supportive of a ban on late term abortions as long as there’s an exception for the safety of the woman’s life.    Both men and women are rating him a bit above average now.  Surely there is some common ground, when both sides can come together and prevent unintended pregnancies.  Communicate that sex shouldn’t be engaged in carelessly.  Adoption choices should be out there.  Those things are now in the Democratic platform, for the first time ever.

McCain: “Health of the mother” has been stretched to mean almost anything (such as mental health in some cases).  Cindy and I are adoptive parents.  We need to promote adoption and protect the rights of the unborn.

Schieffer: A question about education and national security – I missed what all it was.

Obama: No nation has had a bad economy and a good military.  Education is a huge part of this.  We need better pay for teachers.  We need college to be more affordable.  We’ll offer an exchange of community/military service with money for college.  We can’t do this just in schools.  Parents need to show responsibility too – encourage thirst for knowledge.  And he’s absolutely right here.  It starts at home.  People rated him as high as they could.

McCain: Choice and competition among schools are some of the key elements – New York and New Orleans – where we find bad teachers another line of work.  We need to give parents a choice in sending kids to good schools.  Charter schools are one option.

Schieffer: Should the federal government play a larger role?

Obama: The states need to be in control, but the federal government needs to step in and help struggling local school districts.  Bush did this with No Child Left Behind, “but unfortunately, he left the money behind.”  That was a good line.  McCain and I agree on charter schools.  I think we need to encourage competition between schools.  Bad teachers need to be replaced.  “Our kids need to have the best future.”  We disagree on vouchers, and we disagree on college accessibility.  McCain doesn’t have programs that help college groups.  (That’s because he’ll simplify the tax code to make finding tax credits for college easier to find).

McCain: Vouchers need to be provided, because parents WANT vouchers.  They wanted to chose the schools where their children go (this was in Washington, D.C.).  As far as NCLB, it had its flaws and problems, but it’s the first time we looked at this from the national perspective.  Head Start is a great program.  It’s not doing what it should do, so we need to reform it and fund it.  We can’t just give more money, we need to reform it too.  We need transparency, rewards, and funding.  We’ll find and spend money to find the cause of autism, but to have a situation that the most expensive education is in America means that we also need reform.  We can’t throw money at a problem without reform.  Vouchers work.

Obama: On vouchers in D.C.  The D.C. school system is in terrible shape.  The superintendent there is doing a great job (McCain interjected that she supports vouchers).  There’s not proof that vouchers solve the problem.  We need a President who will tackle this head on.

McCain: Obama said that because there’s not enough vouchers, we shouldn’t have any.  That’s wrong.

Schieffer: Closing statements.

McCain: Thank you.  We need a new direction.  “We cannot be satisfied with what we’ve been doing for the last 8 years.”  I’ve been a reformer.  I’ve opposed my party.  I’ve been a good steward of your tax dollars.  We need to make health care and education affordable to all.  We need to stop this wild spending.  All of these promises made tonight will be made based on whether you trust us or not.  I ask you to examine both my record as well as my proposals for this country.  I’ve put my country first.  “It’s been a great honor of my life, and I’ve been proud to serve, and I hope you’ll give me the opportunity to serve again.  I’ll be honored, and humbled.”

Obama: Washington has been unwilling to address the problems.  We cannot adopt the policies of the last 8 years.  We need change.  You’ve invited me into your homes.  “Our brighter days are still ahead, but we have to invest in the American people.”  College needs to be more affordable.  Wages need to be higher, and we need to grow the middle class.  “It’s not gonna be easy.  It’s not gonna be quick.”  Republicans and Democrats will have to come together.  “If you give me the … honor of being President, I will work tireously and  honorably to ensure the future of our children.”

Bob Schieffer: As my mother would say: “Go vote now.  It’ll make you feel big and strong.”

McCain/Obama: Thank you (to each other).

Alright, overall, I think this was BY FAR the best debate we had.  I commend Bob Schieffer.  He was by far the best moderator we had.

Overall, I think McCain won this won.  This is the first time I’ve called a debate (other than the VP debate, where I called Biden the winner), and I think McCain won.  He was VERY strong toward the beginning.  I think Obama was weak at the beginning, but picked it up toward the end, but overall, I think that McCain was the winner.

Again, I think McCain was definitely stronger here.  I think Obama was too weak.  This was definitely the debate McCain needed, but I’m not sure that it’ll be enough for him to recover.

Done Analyzing,

Ranting Republican
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Kansas Senate Candidate Jim Slattery Has Some Clever (and Controversial) TV Ads

October 10, 2008

So, I was watching the news last night, and somebody was doing a story about Kansas Senate candidate, Jim Slattery’s, latest TV ad, “Hosed”:

I was thinking, “Wow, that’s a pretty bold TV ad, but it’s pretty clever and funny too.”

So, then I went to his website and found the rest of his videos, and I found that this isn’t his first controversial ad.  Here’s an ad that he put out about health care, “Uncovered”:

Now, I don’t mean to nitpick here, but it’s pretty obvious that that last guy is wearing stuff under his hospital robe (they could’ve picked a color that wasn’t white for him to wear under the robe, and that would’ve made more sense).

But anyway, I just found those ads to be funny and clever.  Of course I don’t endorse Jim Slattery.  I support Pat Roberts, the current Republican Senator, but that doesn’t mean I can’t like Slattery’s ads.

Done Ranting,

Ranting Republican
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Live Analysis of John McCain’s Acceptance Speech at the RNC

September 4, 2008

Alright, we’re now waiting for McCain to come out and speak – he’s had his family come out and Cindy spoke, theyr’e playing a video of him now.  And his mom just called him a “mamma’s boy” – that was funny.

Talking about his service in the military, and talking about being held as a Prisoner of War – I gotta say, no matter who you are, you have to respect John and any of our troops.

Talking about his time in the Senate, “committed to protect the American people,” opposed to pork barrel spending and tax increases.

Talking about his family, his children.  “What a life, what a faith, what a family.”  Nice quote.

The video is now over, and we are waiting for McCain to come out.

And Fred Thompson is now narrating, John McCain has now come out.  There’s a huge roar from the crowd.

It’s been about 2 minutes, all he’s been able to get out so far is, “Thank you,” over and over again.

“Tonight, I have a privilege given few Americans, a privilege of accepting our party’s nomination for the President of the United States.”  There you go, he is now OFFICIALLY the Republican nominee.

“In my life, no success has come without a fight,” and this campaign wasn’t any different.  He’s saying that that’s a compliment to his former opponents, and he’s thanking them for now supporting him.  I think that’s one of the last few times he’ll need to try to bring bitter people over, people who had supported other Republican candidates, but not him.  Although he probably won’t sway over any more Ron Paul supporters that he hasn’t already won over.

He’s saying he’s grateful for George W. Bush, Laura Bush, George H. W. Bush, and Barbara Bush.  He said he’s “indebted” to Cindy and his 7 kids.  I “can’t imagine a life without the happiness you’ve given me. … [Cindy] is more my inspiration that I am hers.”  And that’s good – showing he’s a down-to-earth family man.  “And I know she will make a great first lady.”

He’s talking about his mother raising him as a kid, while his father was in the Navy, and he’s thanking her now.  96 years old!  Wow – she doesn’t look that old – Congratulations!

“I intend to earn [your trust].”

He’s saying that him and Obama will go at it, “but you have my respect and admiration.”  He’s saying that they’re both Americans, and that means more to him than anything else.  And that’s showing that McCain is going to keep this a civil election, and that ultimately, both want the best for America.

“My friends, we’re going to win this election!”  And that energized the crowd pretty quickly.  He’s showing a lot of optimism going into this.  After we’ve won we’ll “get this country back on the road to prosperity and peace.”  And there’s now a war protester, and they’re all drowning her out with chants of “USA.”  He can’t get a word out.  “My friends, please don’t be diverted by the ground noise and the static.”  And the crowd has erupted.  “Americans want us to stop yelling at each other, OK.”  Back to what he was saying, these are tough times, and he got interrupted again.  Anyway, talking about him showing that a McCain administration will turn the country around, and get us back on our feet.

He’s just talked about Sarah Palin being his running mate, and that she’ll make a great Vice President.  He thanked everyone for their warm welcome last night.  He’s talking about her executive experience, energy, corruption, balancing budgets, taking on special interests, reaching across the aisle – he’s emphasizing things that Obama, who is a rookie as well, hasn’t accomplished.  And that’s the difference of experience.  Both Palin and Obama are rookies, but Palin has actually DONE things!

“I can’t wait to introduce her to Washington. … Change is coming!”  And Palin and McCain will bring change to Washington (sure, not all of it will be good,  but most of it will).

“I’m not in the habit of breaking my promises to my country, and neither is Governor Palin,” so you can count on us saying that we will turn this country around.  They have the strength, judgment, and experience to carry this out, he said.

“I don’t work for special interests.  I don’t work for myself.  I work for you.”  And that was an awesome quote.  It both brings him down to earth, but also appeals to moderates.  He’s talking about fighting corruption, no matter what party, and fighting big spenders in both parties.  And this is one of the things that I love about McCain – he’s saying he’ll veto any pork bills that come to his desk, and I love that policy.  It’s time that we stop wasting money, and McCain will do that for us.

“I’d rather lose an election than see my country lose a war” – using the quote he used during the primary, but that is such a GREAT quote, and it’s so true of John McCain and his “country first” slogan and policy.  Fortunately, the surge worked, and now McCain can go on to both win an election and help us win this war!

“I don’t mind a good fight [and] I’ve had quite a few tough ones in my life. … What you fight for is the real test.  I fight for Americans.  I fight for you.”  Again, a great quote, and McCain will fight for Americans.  Obama has spent most of his time in the Senate campaigning, and before that, he was in the Illinois legislature, where he voted “Present” most of the time.

He’s talking about making sure that the country where we have lost troops “will remain safe from its enemies.”  And he’s showing that he cares about these soldiers who have died overseas.

“We lost the trust of the American people when some Republicans gave in to the temptations of corruption … when we made government bigger … when we valued our power over our principles.  We’re going to change that.”  And he’s again, showing that he will reform government, even if it makes Republicans angry.  “The party of Reagan and Roosevelt and Lincoln is going to get back to basics.”  GREAT quote – as I was saying, Republicans have lost their small government principles, and McCain will bring us back to that.  He’ll end big spending, and give the money back to the people where it belongs.

He’s talking about “letting the people keep the fruits of their labor,” cutting taxes, etc.

“We believe in the values of  families, neighborhoods. … We believe in a government who doesn’t make choices for you, but makes sure that you have choices to make for yourselves.”  McCain will reduce spending and Obama will increase them (McCain said that).  He’s saying that he’ll cut spending, but Obama will raise it.  McCain will encourage jobs, but Obama’s policies won’t.  McCain says he’ll cut the 2nd highest business tax in the world.  He said he’ll double the child tax exemption to $7,000, and that’s something that’ll appeal to the middle class, as it should.

“Government assistance for the unemployed was design for the 1950s.  That’s gonna change under my watch.”  Thank you – the welfare system is so out of date.  We need to completely reform the system (I’d say get rid of it, but that won’t happen, because the American church, who used to do what the government does now, can never take back the responsibility of caring for the poor).

Talking about finding employment at a decent wage.

“Track and reward good teachers, and help bad teachers find another line of work.”  Or you could just fire them!  That was harsh, I know.  “Parents deserve a choice in the education of their children, and I intend to give it to them.”  That’s good, as long as it’s not vouchers.  We don’t let people get out of Medicare taxes if they won’t use Medicare, so I don’t see why we should do it for schools.  “I want schools to answer to parents and students” not unions and bureaucrats “and when I’m President, they will.”  Great quote.  The school system (especially in Michigan, and ESPECIALLY in Wayne County needs reform!).  We need to cut spending where we can, where it’s just being wasted and put it into areas that NEED money.

He’s talking about more offshore drilling, and the crowd loved that – more “Drill baby drill” chants, using nuclear, power, wind, hydroelectric, and tide power plants.  “We must use all resources … to rescue our economy from rising oil prices and restore the health of our planet. … It’s an ambitious plan … but we’ve faced tougher challenges.  It’s time to show the world how Americans lead.”  That’s good.  He emphasized that Obama doesn’t like nuclear, and I LOVE nuclear power, as do a lot of Democrats I know.  We can’t keep making excuses for every type of power plant we find.  There’s downsides to all of them, but we can’t just sit around waiting for the perfect energy solution.

Talking about Iran, and their terrorist-supporting administration.  Talking about Russia invading Georgia, in order to gain more control over oil.

“I know how military works. … I know how the world works.”  He’s talking about knowing what is good in the military, and he said he knows the bad things that have happened in the military.  He will strengthen our military.  Talking about his grandfather, and World War II, and then dying the day after the peace agreement was signed – that shows you what he was living for.  He wanted to see America through the war safely – that is an American patriot for you!

“In America, we change things that need to be changed. … The work that is ours is plainly before us.  We don’t need to search for it.”  From transportation fuel, to disaster response, to the way we train workers.  “We have to catch up to history, and we have to change the way we do business in Washington.”  Emphasizing change is good.  He’s showing that Obama won’t change Washington, he hasn’t.  McCain has been a champion of change, and when he’s President, he will CONTINUE to change Washington.

“I will fix problems that need to be fixed.  I will reach out my hand to anyone to get this country moving again.  I have that record and the scars to prove it.  Senator Obama does not.”  Great quote there – and showing that Obama has been a DO NOTHING Senator, but McCain has done stuff, even when it wasn’t popular.

“We can do anything we put our minds to.  I’ll ask Democrats and Independents to serve with me.  My administration will” be transparent.  And he’s shown he’ll have Independents – I think he’ll have Lieberman in his cabinet.

“I’ve never lived through days, good or bad, that I haven’t thank God for the privilege.”  Good quote there.  Now he’s saying that he “was blessed by misfortune … [in] serving with heroes.”  He’s talking about being captured by the Vietnamese, talking about getting ready to go out for his 23rd mission.  He’s saying that he was doing stuff for his own pleasure and pride.  Now he’s talking about being put into the cell.  Once they found out who his father was, they took him to a hospital, putting him simply in a cast, not setting the bones properly.  Saying that he couldn’t even feed himself, that he was no longer living for selfish independence.  Talking about being with 2 men.  “Those men saved my life.”  Talking about him being offered to leave early, but he refused, because there had been men shot down before him.  And that got a huge response from the crowd, as it should – he’s an American hero, and now they’re shouting “hero” – but he is a hero.  He’s an American patriot and hero.

He’s saying that after he turned down their offer, they abused him more than ever, and they eventually broke him.  He said he was ashamed, but a friend told him that he had fought as hard as he could, and no man can fight alone, but to get up and fight.  “I fell in love with my country when I was a prisoner in someone else’s. … I loved it because it was not just a place, an idea, a cause worth fighting for.  I was never the same again.  I was never my own again anymore.  I was my country’s.”  That was a GREAT quote.  It shows how much dedication he has to his country.  He doesn’t care about himself, but about all of us.

“If you find faults with our country, make it a better one. … become a teacher, enter the ministry, run for public office … teach an illiterate adult to read. … Our country will be better and you will be happier, because nothing is better than to serve a cause other than yourself.  I’m going to fight for my cause every day as your President. … With hard work, strong faith, and a little courage, great things are always within our reach.  Fight with me, fight for what’s good for our country, fight for opportunity for all.  Stand up and defend our country from it’s enemies.  Stand up for each other.  Stand up and fight.  We’re Americans, we never give up, we never quit, we never hide from history, we make history.”  And you couldn’t even hear him anymore, the crowd was just overwhelmingly loud.  They were just cheering and cheering him on.  “Thank you, God bless you, and God bless America.”

There you go – McCain emphasized his moderate views, his reformer views.  He also emphasized his conservative views, but showed that he’s not dedicated to the party, but the American people.  He is dedicated to the American people, and will fight for them if that means opposing Republicans, Democrats, terrorists, or anybody else.

Overall, I’d give it an 9/10.  It was REALLY good at the end, but at other parts, it just didn’t click with me.

Now, the balloons are falling as McCain and Palin’s families are on the stage now.  The crowd is still going wild.  Sarah Palin just said, “They’re beautiful” (at least I think that’s what she said – there’s no mic, I’m trying to read lips).

The balloons are continuing to fall, and the crowd is still cheering, it’s just a fun atmosphere.  McCain and Palin are going out and waving to the crowd, smiling together.  The McCains and Sarah Palin are now walking the crowd, and that is going to wrap up my coverage of the Republican National Convention.  Thank you for reading, and come back here for updates all through until November!

Done Analyzing,

Ranting Republican
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Analysis of Sarah Palin’s Speech at the RNC

September 4, 2008

OK, I’ve had meetings and homework all night, and I’ve been trying to catch up on these speeches.  Palin’s is so long that for now I’ll just analyze half, and then I have to get sleep, or I’m just gonna crash.  So, here goes:

Here she goes, “I will be honored to accept your nomination for the Vice President of the United States.”  And she got a big response right there (of course it was expected) – they really like her.

“I accept the call to help our nominee for President to serve and defend America, and I accept the challenge of a tough fight in this election, against confident opponents, at a crucial hour for our country, and I accept the privilege of serving with a man who has come through much harder missions and met far graver challenges and knows how tough fights are won.  The next President of the United States, John S. McCain.”  She seems very formal in her speaking (and remember, I had to leave for class when she gave her speech in Ohio, so this is really the first I’m seeing over her since she was chosen).

Now she’s talking about being committed when everybody counted him out of the election.  Talking about him saying he’d rather lose an election than a war.  “The pollsters and the pundits overlooked just one thing when they wrote him off.  They overlooked the caliber of the man himself, the determination and resolve, and the sheer guts of Senator John McCain.”  And that got a pretty good response.  “There’s a time for politics, and a time for leadership, a time to campaign, and a time to put our country first.”  She’s building McCain up as this great person for America, but I don’t know what’s different about it.  She seems to be doing it in a unique way, not stressing the moderate viewpoints, but just saying that overall, McCain cares for this country.

She’s talking about serving the country in the Navy, and talking about the troops in Iraq “who now have brought victory within sight.  And as the mother of one of those troops, that is exactly the kind of man I want as Commander in Chief.”  And now they’re showing her son.  But that’s a good quote from her – it shows that as a military mom, she trusts McCain to take care of her son and all the troops overseas.

She’s talking about her son going over to Iraq in a week, as well as her nephew who’s over there now.  She said that her family is so proud of all of the men and women serving the country in uniform.  Now chants of “USA” have broken out.

Now she’s back to talking about her family.  Now she just introduced her daughters.  They look like such a nice loving family, and the youngest daughter is so cute.  Bristol’s boyfriend (soon to be husband) is with Bristol now – holding her hand.  Again, I wish them the best!

She’s talking about her son, who has Down’s Syndrome and that “children with special needs inspire a very very special love.”  And that got a HUGE response from the crowd.  Sarah just seems like such an amazing mother – she’s down to earth and just comes across as so nice and loving.  She told families of special needs children that “if [we are] elected, you will have a friend and advocate in the White House.”

Talking about her husband, Todd, who is a union member, and that could help with union members, especially in Michigan, where the race is close and we have a lot of unions.  And she’s talking a bit about how they met.  The crowd loves him as the whole family stands up.  Honestly though, I think some of this could’ve been cut out to save time.  Maybe I’m just tired of speeches (or tired period), but I think this speech may seem too long.  She’s talking about her parents now.

She’s talking about hard working Americans who “love their country in good times and bad, and they’re always proud of America.”  Talking about farmers and factory workers, the working class citizens of America.

She’s talking about having the privilege of living in a small town and being a hockey mom and on the PTA.  And there’s some chants of “hockey mom” in the crowd.  “They say the difference between a hockey mom and a pit bull, lipstick.”  That was a good one.

She’s talking about joining the PTA to make children’s education better, and running for city council.  She’s talking about being mayor of her hometown, and then running for Governor.  “I guess a small town mayor is sorta like a community organizer, except that you have actual responsibilites.”  ZING!  Wow – that got a great response from the crowd.  And that was just an exceptional point to make – showing that even rookie politician Sarah Palin has more experience than Barack Obama.

“I might add that in small towns we don’t quite know what to make of a candidate who lavishes praise on working people when they’re listening, and then talks about how bitterly they cling to their religion and guns when those people aren’t listening.  No, we tend to prefer candidates who don’t talk about us one way in Scranton and anothe way in San Francisco.  As for my running mate, you can be certain that wherever he goes and whoever is listening, John McCain is the same man.”  And it’s good to get that perspective of how offensive that was to small town Americans.  It really shows how out of touch Obama is, and how offensive that comment was to small town Americans.

And this seems like a good spot to stop for now.  I’ll finish up my analysis in the morning.

OK – back up and finishing her speech:

“Well, I’m not a member of the permanent political establishment … and if you’re not a member … some in the media consider a candidate unqualified for that reason alone.  Here’s a little newsflash for those reporters and commentators: I’m not going to Washington to seek their opinion.  I’m going to Washington to serve this great country.”  And that got a HUGE response from the crowd.  She’s showing that she’s not the same old politician that we’re used to, but that she CARES about the people she’s serving.

She’s talking about the right reason being “to serve the common good and to leave this nation better than we found it.”  She’s talking about being expected to govern with integrity and a servant’s heart, and she just promised to carry herself like that as Vice President.  She’s saying that this is the same spirit when she ran for Governor and stood up to corrupt politics.  She’s talking about true reform being hard to achieve, but she had the people’s support and was able to overcome the corrrupt machines inside of Alaskan politics.

She’s talking about ethics reform, and getting rid of stuff that Alaskan citizens shouldn’t have to pay for, such as the luxury jet that she put on eBay.  She said that there’s no reason that she needed a personal chef.

Now she’s talking about using the veto, and that McCain will use it to avoid wasteful spending.  She’s talking about ending earmark spending from Congress.  She said no to the Bridge to Nowhere.  If Alaska wanted to build the bridge, she said “we’d do it ourselves.”

She’s talking about breaking away from oil company lobbyists and breaking their monopoly on power and resources.  She said she’s a champion of competition and fairness.

Talking about the natural gas pipeline, “to help lead America to energy independence.”  She’s saying that we will have to rely less on dangerous nations.  We won’t have to draw from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve when a hurricane comes into the Gulf of Mexico.

“We cannot leave ourselves at the mercy of foreign suppliers.”  She’s talking about Iran and Russia trying to take over more and more of the oil supply.  She’s saying that “we need to produce more of our oil and gas. … Take it from a gal who knows the north slope of Alaska–we’ve got lots of both.”  And the crowd liked that one, but she makes a good point.  And there go the “Drill baby drill” chants again.  Anyway, Palin, an Alaskan understand more than most people that we CAN drill in and off the shore of Alaska, without harming the wildlife as a whole.  Will we hurt some animals?  Probably, but that happens ANY time we build anything.  With people come cars, an it’d inevitable that a car will hit an animal, but we don’t say, “We need to save the squirrels, so no more roads,” so why are we keeping from drilling in Alaska because we may wind up killing 100 or so animals?

Now she’s going on about drilling, that it won’t solve our problems, “but the fact that drilling won’t solve every problem is no excuse to do nothing at all.”  And that’s so true.  We should be doing EVERYTHING we can to end the energy crisis: drill for oil, build nuclear power plants, build wind power plants, etc….

She’s saying that a McCain Palin administration will drill, build a pipeline, build nuclear, wind, solar, geothermal, and other power plants.  She’s a nuclear power girl!  I like her!  Talking about using AMERICAN workers.

“I’ve noticed a pattern with our opponent … we’ve all heard his dramatic speeches before devoted followers, … but listening to him speak, it’s easy to forget this this is the man who has authored 2 memoirs, but a single major law or even a reform, not even in the state Senate!”  And  that’s awesome right there.  Reminding people that Obama has done pretty much nothing as a legislator shows that he’s inexperienced.  Inexperience is different than being new.  Palin is new, but she has experience.  She has actually DONE THINGS since she’s been in office, not vote “Present” or go around campaigning for President for 2 years.

“This is the (or a) man who can give an entire speech about the wars America is fighting and never use the word “victory” except when he’s talking about his own campaign.  And that right there makes the military families happy about McCain.

Now she made a joke about Obama’s fake White House columns getting taken back to a studio – it was a pretty good joke.  She’s saying he’ll take more money and weaken us as a nation in the world.  She said, “Victory in Iraq is finally in sight, and he wants to forfeit.”  She’s talking about Al Qaeda terrorists getting ready to attack us and “he’s worried that someone won’t read him (a terrorist) his rights.”  That’s good right there – she’s showing that a lot of what Obama wants is simply BAD for America.

“Government is too big, he wants to grow it.  Congress spends too much money, he promises more.  Taxes are too high, and he wants to raise them.  His tax increases are the fine print in his economic plan.”  He’ll raise income, payroll, investment income, death, and business taxes.  It’s good that she’s showing that Obama WILL raise taxes (other than those making around I believe it’s $40,000 a year or less, and trust me, $50,000 is not that much to live off of that you need to be taxed more).

She’s saying, how will these people be better off if Obama increases taxes?

“In politics, there are some candidates who use change to promote their careers, and then, there are those, like John McCain, who use their careers to promote change.”  And there you go – she’s showing that Obama is just using what America wants to hear to get elected, but in reality, he’s going to drive America into the ground.

“They are the ones whose names appear on laws and landmark reforms, not just on buttons and banners, or on self-designed Presidential seals.”  That was a good one again.

She’s saying that “there are those, like John McCain, that actually do great things,” that they’re the ones we can “count on to serve and to defend America.”  She’s talking about Senator McCain having a great record on reform, and that’s why lobbyists oppose him so much.  “He’s a man [who will] serve his country, and not just his party.  A leader who’s not looking for a fight, but sure isn’t afraid of one either.”  And that shows that McCain is different from other politicians, but he’ll stand up for what he believes in.  And the fact that liberals hate him, means that “we have chosen the right man.”  And she’s right here – the fact that liberals hate him so much, means that he’s what we need in the White House.

“Take the Maverick out of the Senate–put him into the White House.”  GREAT quote!

“There is only one man in this election who has ever fought for you,” contrasting that against Biden and Obama saying that they’re fighting for “you,” meaning the American people.  And that’s true.  All that Biden and Obama care about is getting themselves elected.

She’s talking about McCain bringing compassion, wisdom, and confidence to the White House, all because of what he faced over in Vietnam, seeing evil, and seeing evil be overcome.

She’s telling a story of McCain smiling and giving a thumbs up to a fellow POW, after McCain would come back from being beaten, a smile of encouragement and that everything would one day be OK.  “That is the kind of man America needs to see us through the next 4 years.”  And she’s right.  McCain has been through trials and tough times, and he’s shown that he can not only pull through himself, but help others pull through as well.

“For a season, a gifted speaker can inspire with his words, but for a lifetime, John McCain has inspired with his deeds.  If character is the measure in this election, and hope the theme, and change the goal we share, then I ask you to join our cause.  Join our cause and help America elect a great man as the next President of the United States.  Thank you, and God bless America.  Thank you.”

And there you have it, Sarah Palin’s speech to the RNC.

Overall, I thought it was a good speech.  She definitely appealed to the Republican base, portraying McCain as both a conservative and reformer (just like herself).  But she also showed that McCain is a Maverick on some issues, and some of her speech will appeal to undecided voters.

Overall, I say it was good, but it wasn’t the best speech I’ve heard through the conventions.  I’ll give it a 9/10.

Done Analyzing,

Ranting Republican
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Did Paris Hilton’s Response to McCain’s Ad Hurt McCain?

August 8, 2008

Alright, so as I posted about before, John McCain put out an ad called “Celeb” which shows Paris Hilton and Britney Spears, and compares Barack Obama to them, saying that he’s a celebrity.

Then Paris Hilton responded with the following ad (sorry, I can’t embed it – WordPress won’t let me, and I can’t upload it to YouTube: http://www.funnyordie.com/videos/64ad536a6d.

I thought it was pretty funny, and it was pretty amazing that she memorized all of that (in that short of time, even I’d have a tough time getting almost 2 minutes of script down).

Her energy policy was actually pretty good (and was proposed by several Democrats and Republicans in news interviews after the House failed to pass anything).

So, my question is, did that hurt McCain?  I thought McCain’s ad backfired, but many people (especially liberals) have said that they thought it was a successful ad, and pointed to a jump in the polls for McCain.  I’d really love your input on this.

McCain has since come out with a new ad, “Family,” which is a lot of the “Celeb” ad, minus the Paris/Britney pictures:

So, again, tell me what you think about McCain and Paris’s ads.

Done Polling,

Ranting Republican
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Analysis of McCain’s “Celeb” Ad: Both McCain and Obama Have Been Treated Like Celebrities

August 2, 2008

Well, I’m sure many of you have heard about John McCain’s latest attack ad, titled “Celeb.”

Before I get into too many details, I’ll give you a chance to watch it:

Now, that ad has certainly raised eyebrows in political circles.  I personally enjoyed the Detroit Free Press’s recent headline: “Ad Wars: Obama, McCain … Britney?”

Now, let’s get down to my analysis.  Is McCain right in saying that Obama is the world’s biggest celebrity?  If not, the claim is pretty close to true.  I’d say he’s probably right, depending on how you’re going to defin celebrity.  The point is, Obama is about as popular as chocolate right now (speaking of chocolate, I’m gonna go grab another Snickers ice cream bar – those things are awesome!).  But, does McCain really have room to talk?  In my opinion, BOTH Obama and McCain won their party’s nominations, in large part, due to the media factor.  I’ve said NUMEROUS times that it was the media’s latching on to a couple New Hampshire polls that gave him momentum there, and then on to Michigan (where he performed well against Mitt Romney), and on to South Carolina.

Do I think that comparing Obama to Paris Hilton and Britney Spears was a little over the line?  Not really.  It was a little harsh maybe (it was harsh to Hilton, saying she’s basically equal to Britney Speares!), but I think it was just intended as a little bit of fun.  And compared to political ads in the past, this is nothing.  Take the Daisy Ad of 1964 (Lyndon Johnson’s ad against Barry Goldwater), which essentially said, if you vote for Goldwater, your little girl is gonna get melted by a nuke.  The only other attack ad that comes close to that was the Willie Horton Ad of 1988, but that was an issue ad.

The point is, this is a JOKE compared to some of the ads that we’ve had before.  And McCain even CONFIRMS this: “We were having some fun.  We were having some fun with our supporters that we sent it out to and we’re gonna display a sense of humor in this campaign.”  That comment was made in regards to a different ad, “The One,” but the premise remains the same.  McCain later said, “This is a very respectful campaign.  I’ve repeated my admiration and respect for Senator Obama. … I don’t think our campaign is negative in the slightest.  I’m, we think it’s got a lot of humor in it and we’re having fun and enjoying it.  And that is what campaigns are going to be like.”

Now, on to the substance of the ad: the ad talks briefly about Obama and oil/taxes.  Although the transition from celebrity to issues seemed very abrupt and awkward (one of the reasons I didn’t like the ad that much), it kinda says that McCain has a better stance on oil/energy and taxes (which he does, in my opinion), but doesn’t go into as many details as he sould’ve.  He leaves it open for Obama to do a counter-ad, which he does, and pulls off a much more effective ad than McCain did, although I still think Obama’s energy plan stinks.

McCain’s ad’s grades: Style: B+.  Substance: C-.  Overall grade: C+

Obama’s ad: Style: B.  Substance: A.  Overall: B+

So, ultimately, I think that McCain’s ad was funny, but failed as an ad because Obama had a better counter.

Done Rating,

Ranting Republican
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Gas Prices Are Too High, and Joe Knollenberg Has a Plan to Fix That

June 19, 2008

Alright, this is the next segment in my series on  the race for Michigan’s 9th District.  Although it doesn’t directly tie into what’s going on in the race, gas prices are rising and that’s making it an important issue (especially considering the current economy).

Knollenberg himself, outlined a plan to reduce gas prices, saying, “These high gas prices are totally unacceptable.”

Knollenberg held the press conference with House Minority Whip Roy Blunt (R-MO).  Blunt shared Knollenberg’s thoughts about adding to the refinery capacity for refineries in the U.S., to stop placing oil into natural reserves, urging foreign countries to increase their oil output, and accessing oil resources under public land and water through environmentally safe methods, saying, “It’s foolish not to use the oil and natural gas both [under] the ground and in deep water.”

But, Knollenberg (like anybody who knows something about energy), doesn’t want to simply rely on oil.  He has supported wind and nuclear (my personal favorite – I’ve been a HUGE advocate for nuclear power) power plants as well as conserving energy at home and on the road (through simply turning off lights to carpooling).

Knollenberg introduced The New Bridging Industry and Government Through Hi-Tech Research on Energy Efficiency Act, the “New Big Three Act,” which will promote more energy efficient technology, both in the public and private sectors.  Among other things, the act would:

  • Provide $750 million in grants over 5 years for research and develop advanced vehicle batteries.
  • Provide $250 million over 5 years to add hydrogen fuel stations to existing gas stations.
  • Spend $150 million over 3 years for the government to purchase hydrogen vehicles.
  • Help auto makers meet federal Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards.

Knollenberg showed confidence in his plan, saying, “My plan will turn the tide [and] bring gas prices back to reality.”

The law is currently being reviewed by the House Ways and Means Committee, and Knollenberg is expected to push for a vote on the floor later this week.

Personally, I think it’s a great plan.  Although I’d like to see more of a push for nuclear power, many people don’t like nuclear power, and it suffers  from the “just not in my back yard” argument more than any other type of power.

Although I don’t know his policies, I’m fairly confident that Knollenberg’s opponent, Gary Peters, would side with most of the Democrats in their proposed tax on the oil companies, which will do nothing for consumers and only hurt workers of the oil companies.

Done Ranting,

Ranting Republican
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