Archive for December, 2008

I’m In Wisconsin

December 30, 2008

I’m in Wisconsin until Saturday, and it looks like this may be some of my only Internet access.  So, if I don’t get a chance to wish you all a happy new year, have a safe and happy new year.

Things are going good.  I will ask for prayers for my aunt – she hit a bump while sledding today and fractured 4 vertebrae.  She’s expected to recover fine, but it’s still pretty painful.

Other than that, I’m having fun out here – decent amount of snow, and pretty much anywhere is better than Detroit (except maybe Camden, NJ).  Alright, enough with the lame jokes.  NO – wait, we can’t end this without a joke about the 0-16 lions.  Speaking of the Lions, at the hospital today, the doctor told my uncle (wearing his Lions) coat that he must really be a loyal fan.  Alright, that’s close enough to a lame joke, since we’re about to eat Chinese food (it’s awesome – I’ve heard it’s really good quality Chinese – they use USDA Grade A cat).  OK, I’m done; I promise.

Take care yall!  Drive safe tomorrow, and PLEASE don’t drive drunk!  Call a cab – it’s cheaper than a casket!

Done  Ranting,

Ranting Republican

Should the U.S. Government Be Tracking Santa?

December 26, 2008

noradsantaAlright, I already know that I’m gonna take some heat for this post, but I’ve never been one to back down due to unpopularity.  This year, like they have for the past 53 years, the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) tracked Santa as he travelled from the North Pole around the world delivering presents.  Now, NORAD isn’t all U.S. funded, since it’s a joint organization of the Canadian Forces Air Command and the United States Air Force.

So, I began thinking, “Isn’t this kinda wasting government money?”  So, I did some research.  I went to www.noradsanta.org and began looking around.  I found this information about NORAD’s Santa tracking operation:

Since that time, NORAD men, women, family and friends have selflessly volunteered their time to personally respond to Christmas Eve phone calls and emails from children. In addition, we now track Santa using the internet. Last year, millions of people who wanted to know Santa’s whereabouts visited the NORAD Tracks Santa website.

So, from what I understand, the people aren’t getting paid, but that still doesn’t account for the website and actually running the operation on Christmas Eve / Christmas.  I know I must seem like such a Scrooge, but I just can’t justify the government tracking Santa, since he poses absolutely no threat to our air space.

Now, that being said, the nice, loving side of me is hating my fiscally responsible half right now, but I still can’t justify our government spending money on this.  If anybody from NORAD is reading this, could you tell me how much is actually spent on the Santa tracking operation?  Now, if this is all paid for by some fund or volunteers, I have no problem with NORAD being the face of the operation, I just can’t justify government funds going toward tracking Santa.

Alright, now it’s time for your opinion:

Done Ranting,

Ranting Republican
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Merry Christmas!

December 25, 2008

Right now I’m in between making 2 batches of Christmas candy (2 more to go), and I just wanted to take a break to say MERRY CHRISTMAS.  It’s been a busy day, from my car breaking down while I went Christmas shopping (apparently killing the power steering, the battery, and overheating the car was God’s way of telling me not to procrastinate anymore), to going to 2 church services (I like my current church, but there’s nothing like going back to my Old Presbyterian Church, singing some classic hymns and Christmas songs, and seeing a bunch of elderly women who love seeing me and my sister every time we visit – and the food’s always good too), to going to K-Mart to buy more sugar for the Christmas candy and overhearing the girl behind me say, “I’m buying cigs for my dad to put in his stocking … I couldn’t think of anything to get him.”

But from church to cigarettes to candy, I just want to remind everybody out there to take a break from your busy lives and think about what really matters today: Christ.  You see God really does put the Christ in Christmas, and more people (including myself) need to stop and ponder this.

Now, if you’re not a Christian, then that’s fine too, but don’t give me any of this “Happy Holidays” crap.  Christmas has been recognized as a federal holiday.  If you don’t think that it’s a secular holiday too, then I urge you to show up to work.  If you work in a factory where you need lots of people to make the place run, go in and just clean up.  If you don’t have a key, go around and offer to shovel snow as a job – I’m sure somebody will hire you.  Or offer taxi services – there’ll be lots of drunk people who need it.  Point is, I’m sure you could find a job somewhere, but most of you will enjoy the day off, so call it as it is and say, “Merry Christmas.”

Alright, I’m off to go make more candy.

I wish you all a safe and Merry Christmas.  If you’re travelling and it’s snowing, drive safe – better to get there late than not at all.  The same principle applies to drinking and driving – just don’t do it.  Get a friend to drive or hire a cab.

Merry Christmas folks!

Done Celebrating,

Ranting Republican
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President Bush Approves $17.4 Billion Auto Bailout

December 19, 2008

Alright, well this morning, President Bush held a press conference where he announced his plans to give  a $17.4 billion loan to GM and Chrysler.  Here’s a video of  that press conference (courtesy of FOX), and I have a transcript (again, courtesy of FOX) which I’ve done a “play-by-play” analysis of below:

STATEMENT BY THE PRESIDENT ON THE ADMINISTRATION’S PLAN TO ASSIST THE AUTOMAKERS

Roosevelt Room

9:01 A.M. EST

THE PRESIDENT: Good morning. For years, America’s automakers have faced serious challenges — burdensome costs, a shrinking share of the market, and declining profits. In recent months, the global financial crisis has made these challenges even more severe. Now some U.S. auto executives say that their companies are nearing collapse — and that the only way they can buy time to restructure is with help from the federal government.

This is a difficult situation that involves fundamental questions about the proper role of government. On the one hand, government has a responsibility not to undermine the private enterprise system. On the other hand, government has a responsibility to safeguard the broader health and stability of our economy.

Well, personally, I think that the best way to safeguard the health and stability of our economy is to NOT give out loans to companies who were irresponsible!

Addressing the challenges in the auto industry requires us to balance these two responsibilities. If we were to allow the free market to take its course now, it would almost certainly lead to disorderly bankruptcy and liquidation for the automakers. Under ordinary economic circumstances, I would say this is the price that failed companies must pay — and I would not favor intervening to prevent the automakers from going out of business.

How exactly would the bankruptcy be disorderly?  The whole point of  bankruptcy is to keep the process orderly.  And if President Bush means liquidation as in the entire company, then this press conference was just a scare tactic to get the American people behind the auto bailout.  The companies wouldn’t go under.

But these are not ordinary circumstances. In the midst of a financial crisis and a recession, allowing the U.S. auto industry to collapse is not a responsible course of action. The question is how we can best give it a chance to succeed. Some argue the wisest path is to allow the auto companies to reorganize through Chapter 11 provisions of our bankruptcy laws — and provide federal loans to keep them operating while they try to restructure under the supervision of a bankruptcy court. But given the current state of the auto industry and the economy, Chapter 11 is unlikely to work for American automakers at this time.

American consumers understand why: If you hear that a car company is suddenly going into bankruptcy, you worry that parts and servicing will not be available, and you question the value of your warranty. And with consumers hesitant to buy new cars from struggling automakers, it would be more difficult for auto companies to recover.

Then by this argument, Chapter 11 would NEVER work for an auto company, because people would be hesitant to buy.  And how do you remedy these fears?  You emphasize the fact that 3rd party institutions offer warranties, and you don’t HAVE to go to the dealer to get your car serviced.  There are lots of other shops that do just as good of a job, if not a BETTER job than the dealership.

Additionally, the financial crisis brought the auto companies to the brink of bankruptcy much faster than they could have anticipated — and they have not made the legal and financial preparations necessary to carry out an orderly bankruptcy proceeding that could lead to a successful restructuring.

Um … when they were losing money years ago and asked the UAW members to take a pay cut, but the union said no, so in order to avoid a strike, the companies gave in, the companies should have known that continuing to pay wages that you can’t afford would make you go into bankruptcy eventually.  Like I’ve said before, it’s the companies’ heads’ fault for not cutting wages of the workers as well as taking pay cuts themselves, and it’s the UAW members’ fault for being greedy and refusing to budge at all.

The convergence of these factors means there’s too great a risk that bankruptcy now would lead to a disorderly liquidation of American auto companies. My economic advisors believe that such a collapse would deal an unacceptably painful blow to hardworking Americans far beyond the auto industry. It would worsen a weak job market and exacerbate the financial crisis. It could send our suffering economy into a deeper and longer recession. And it would leave the next President to confront the demise of a major American industry in his first days of office.

Are these the same economic advisors who encouraged the Economic Stimulus Package and the first bailout bill?  Because if so, they suck, and I would have fired them a LONG time ago.

A more responsible option is to give the auto companies an incentive to restructure outside of bankruptcy — and a brief window in which to do it. And that is why my administration worked with Congress on a bill to provide automakers with loans to stave off bankruptcy while they develop plans for viability. This legislation earned bipartisan support from majorities in both houses of Congress.

If bipartisan you mean Democrats along with traitorous Republicans, then yes, I guess it was bipartisan.  HOWEVER, I commend the brave and honorable REAL Republicans who stood up against this bailout, and the other bailouts.  I especially commend Bob Corker (R-TN) for standing up against the UAW.  Of course, Ron Paul (R-TX) must be mentioned, since he’s hugely against this as well.  I commend all 28 Republicans who had the common sense to vote against this bill.

Unfortunately, despite extensive debate and agreement that we should prevent disorderly bankruptcies in the American auto industry, Congress was unable to get a bill to my desk before adjourning this year.

This means the only way to avoid a collapse of the U.S. auto industry is for the executive branch to step in. The American people want the auto companies to succeed, and so do I. So today, I’m announcing that the federal government will grant loans to auto companies under conditions similar to those Congress considered last week.

These loans will provide help in two ways. First, they will give automakers three months to put in place plans to restructure into viable companies — which we believe they are capable of doing. Second, if restructuring cannot be accomplished outside of bankruptcy, the loans will provide time for companies to make the legal and financial preparations necessary for an orderly Chapter 11 process that offers a better prospect of long-term success — and gives consumers confidence that they can continue to buy American cars.

Because Congress failed to make funds available for these loans, the plan I’m announcing today will be drawn from the financial rescue package Congress approved earlier this fall. The terms of the loans will require auto companies to demonstrate how they would become viable. They must pay back all their loans to the government, and show that their firms can earn a profit and achieve a positive net worth. This restructuring will require meaningful concessions from all involved in the auto industry — management, labor unions, creditors, bondholders, dealers, and suppliers.

Well obviously they have to pay back the loans.  It’s not a loan if you keep the money!

In particular, automakers must meet conditions that experts agree are necessary for long-term viability — including putting their retirement plans on a sustainable footing, persuading bondholders to convert their debt into capital the companies need to address immediate financial shortfalls, and making their compensation competitive with foreign automakers who have major operations in the United States. If a company fails to come up with a viable plan by March 31st, it will be required to repay its federal loans.

OK, this is where this whole thing just confuses the crap out of me.  We give them the money, and they spend it.  If they don’t have a plan by March 31st, they have to give all the money back.  But does Bush really think that they’ll have all the money that we gave them?  If they do, then it’s OBVIOUS that they don’t NEED the loan, because they still have enough money!  If they can’t repay us back, how is it any different than a normal loan.  How are we going to force  them to pay us back?  The entire PREMISE around this bailout is just idiotic!

The automakers and unions must understand what is at stake, and make hard decisions necessary to reform, These conditions send a clear message to everyone involved in the future of American automakers: The time to make the hard decisions to become viable is now — or the only option will be bankruptcy.

The actions I’m announcing today represent a step that we wish were not necessary. But given the situation, it is the most effective and responsible way to address this challenge facing our nation. By giving the auto companies a chance to restructure, we will shield the American people from a harsh economic blow at a vulnerable time. And we will give American workers an opportunity to show the world once again they can meet challenges with ingenuity and determination, and bounce back from tough times, and emerge stronger than before.

Thank you.

END 9:08 A.M. EST

Well, I have now lost most all of the approval that I still had for the Bush administration.

There’s still a glimmer of hope: Once Treasury Secretary Paulson actually makes a formal request, the money will be released unless Congress rejects the request within 15 days.  I can only hope that Republicans oppose it and that enough Democrats, angry at the way Bush has handled the release of money, will oppose this awful plan.  Sadly, I don’t see that happening; however, I will hope and pray and continue advocating that we put a stop to all of this economic nonsense!

This bailout plan is NOT the solution.  Like I said, the entire premise of it is flawed: We’ll loan you money to spend, but if you don’t have a good plan, you have to give that money back.  Well, either the money is STILL in their bank accounts (meaning they didn’t NEED the money), or the money has already been SPENT (partially)!

We need some strong fiscal conservatives to show what the Republican party truly stands for.  We need more people like Neil Cavuto, Bob Corker, and Ron Paul.  I’m tired of the Republicans here in Michigan supporting the bailout because it will help our state.  It’s selfish and wrong.  I’m especially disappointed in Representative Pete Hoekstra, who has always been very outspoken about fiscal conservativism.  We need people who will fight for economic justice!  We need people who will fight for the American TAXPAYER!

Done Ranting,

Ranting Republican
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Mark Felt, “Deep Throat” in Watergate Scandal, Has Died

December 19, 2008

This is news that just broke a little while ago: Mark Felt, the number 2 FBI official during the Watergate scandal, also known as the informant “Deep Throat” died on Thursday at 12:45 P.M. at a hospice facility near his home, according to his daughter Joan.  Joan told reporters that he “was fine this morning [and was] joking with his caregiver.”  He then ate breakfast and took a nap, saying he was tired.  He then died in his sleep.  “He slipped away,” she said.

Felt was 95.

In 2005, Felt revealed that he had been “Deep Throat,” the one who had given Bob Woodward of The Washington Post leads in the Watergate affair in the early 1970s, when Woodward and his partner, Carl Bernstein were covering the scandal.  The revelation came as a shock to even Woodward and Bernstein, since they had promised not to reveal his identity until after his death.

My thoughts and prayers will be with his family.  May he rest in peace.  He was a good man.

Done Reporting,

Ranting Republican
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Ron Paul Was Right (The [Short] Movie!)

December 18, 2008

I ran across the following video on my homepage on YouTube earlier today.  It details some of the predictions that were made by Representative Ron Paul the Great (R-TX) and Peter Schiff (head of Euro Pacific Capital) about the economy:

Honestly, it amazes me how much Ron Paul has been right, yet people still dismiss him as some wacky libertarian politician.  Sure, SOME of his supporters may have been a little … weird, but for the most part, his supporters were normal, just like him.

And although I didn’t vote for him in the primary (he probably would’ve been my second or third pick), I at least have the common courtesy to say when he’s right, and when it comes to economic issues especially, that’s almost every time he speaks.  And I don’t think that it’s because Dr. Paul is some super-genius (although he is a VERY bright individual); I think it’s because he’s not afraid to call things as he sees them.  There’s no sugar coating with him.

He called things such as the trouble with adjustable rate mortgages (ARMs), the problems with the Federal Reserve, and inflation years ago.

I give a lot of credit to Neil Cavuto the Great for acknowledging that Paul was right.

And honestly, I am ashamed of the Republican Party for the way that they tried to ostracize Representative Paul because he has a different stance on a few issues.

That video also had a clip from an interview with Representative Joe Knollenberg (R-MI)  (the one where he said, “It’s not your money”) that I did a blog post on.  When I hear that, it still appalls me that he could say that (and he’s one of my favorite representatives).

My only hope is that we will start listening to the things that Ron Paul is saying, especially when it comes to the economy.  With the situation that we’re in, how can we afford not to listen to somebody who has the great track record that Dr. Paul does when it comes to the future of our economy!

Done Ranting,

Ranting Republican
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2 Michigan Teens Arrested for Throwing Rocks at Cars

December 18, 2008

Yesterday, 2 cousins from Eastpointe, Michigan, both high school freshmen, were arrested for throwing rocks on cars driving along I-94 in Saint Clair Shores.  The teens claimed that they did it because they were bored of playing  video games.  In all, 16 cars were damaged, and in addition to probably paying for the damage, the teens have been charged as juveniles with malicious destruction of property.  Here’s a FOX 2 video report on the incident:

Now, these teens should have known better.  And they did know better.  Freshmen in high school aren’t stupid.  If you drop a rock on a car, that’s going to shatter the windshield if it hits it (as it did) or put a dent in the metal.  What happens when your windshield shatters?  Somebody could die.  And people have died in the past.

These teens need to be taught a lesson and need to be given a strict punishment.  Michigan Compiled Laws Chapter 750.377a (Act 328 of 1931) states:

750.377a Willful and malicious destruction of property; personalty.

Sec. 377a.

(1) A person who willfully and maliciously destroys or injures the personal property of another person is guilty of a crime as follows:

(a) If any of the following apply, the person is guilty of a felony punishable by imprisonment for not more than 10 years or a fine of not more than $15,000.00 or 3 times the amount of the destruction or injury, whichever is greater, or both imprisonment and a fine:

(i) The amount of the destruction or injury is $20,000.00 or more.

(b) If any of the following apply, the person is guilty of a felony punishable by imprisonment for not more than 5 years or a fine of not more than $10,000.00 or 3 times the amount of the destruction or injury, whichever is greater, or both imprisonment and a fine:

(i) The amount of the destruction or injury is $1,000.00 or more but less than $20,000.00.

(c) If any of the following apply, the person is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment for not more than 1 year or a fine of not more than $2,000.00 or 3 times the amount of the destruction or injury, whichever is greater, or both imprisonment and a fine:

(i) The amount of the destruction or injury is $200.00 or more but less than $1,000.00.

(d) If the amount of the destruction or injury is less than $200.00, the person is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment for not more than 93 days or a fine of not more than $500.00 or 3 times the amount of the destruction or injury, whichever is greater, or both imprisonment and a fine.

I’m guessing that most of the damage is going to fall under subsection (c), meaning that the teenagers could face  up to 1 year in prison or a fine of $2,000 (since I’m guessing that most of the repairs won’t be more than a few hundred dollars).

Personally, I’d be locking both of them up for 16 years (as long  as all the damage was over $200 for each car).  They knew better, and they need to pay, in both a criminal and civil court (civil court would be where the teens would have to pay for the damage, probably around $500/windshield if it’s totally busted, so they’re looking at a few thousand dollars depending on what all was done to the different cars).

Make an example out of these teens to show that you don’t play around with dangerous stuff like this.

Done Ranting,

Ranting Republican
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Another Perspective on the Auto Bailout

December 17, 2008

I came across a column by economist Thomas Sowell this morning entitled “Postponing Reality,” and I’d just like to discuss part of this column with you:

We are told that the collapse of the Big Three automakers in Detroit would have repercussions across the country, causing mass layoffs among firms that supply the automobile makers with parts, and shutting down automobile dealerships from coast to coast.

You should hear the news stations here in Detroit.  The news anchors night after night of covering House and Senate votes keep making comments like, “Some Senators just don’t understand how detrimental this will be to Detroit,” or “The Southern Senators don’t understand what’s happening here in Detroit” or “Talk to your friends in other states about contacting their representatives to explain how bad this would be for Michigan.”  And you can substitute the word Senators with Republicans for a lot of the news anchors, since the media here in Detroit tends to lean left (as does all of Wayne County).

A renowned economist of the past, J.A. Schumpeter, used to refer to progress under capitalism as “creative destruction”– the replacement of businesses that have outlived their usefulness with businesses that carry technological and organizational creativity forward, raising standards of living in the process.

It’s survival of the fittest, economic style.

Indeed, this is very much like what happened a hundred years ago, when that new technological wonder, the automobile, wreaked havoc on all the forms of transportation built up around horses.

For thousands of years, horses had been the way to go, whether in buggies or royal coaches, whether pulling trolleys in the cities or plows on the farms. People had bet their futures on something with a track record of reliable success going back many centuries.

Were all these people to be left high and dry? What about all the other people who supplied the things used with horses– oats, saddles, horse shoes and buggies? Wouldn’t they all go falling like dominoes when horses were replaced by cars?

Unfortunately for all the good people who had in good faith gone into all the various lines of work revolving around horses, there was no compassionate government to step in with a bailout or a stimulus package.

They had to face reality, right then and right there, without even a postponement.

He actually brings up a really good point here.  Industries go through cycles, and to stop these cycles with the use of  government funds is only going to harm us more in the long run.  Like I’ve said before, the main reason that Michiganders support this is because it helps Michigan.  If the technology industry were to suffer detrimental losses, I’d be willing to bet that you couldn’t find 30% of Michiganders who would be in favor of spending billions of tax dollars on helping Silicon Valley in California.

Who would have thought that those who displaced them would find themselves in a similar situation a hundred years later?

Actually the automobile industry is not nearly in as bad a situation now as the horse-based industries were then. There is no replacement for the automobile anywhere on the horizon. Nor has the public decided to do without cars indefinitely.

While Detroit’s Big Three are laying off thousands of workers, Toyota is hiring thousands of workers right here in America, where a substantial share of all our Toyotas are manufactured.

 But Toyota doesn’t have union workers.  Without unions, their workers make (on average) a measly $30/hour.  Wait a minute, that’s not measly.  In fact, that’s more than the average GM worker ($29.78/hour).  The difference comes in pensions and health care.   GM has to pay out an extra $39.22/hour (that includes pensions for retirees), while Toyota has to pay out an extra $18/hour (with far less retirees).  So, the average Toyota worker (assuming he worked 40 hours/week with 4 weeks of vacation), would make $57,600.  That’s not that bad folks.  You assume that his spouse works part time (20 hours/week at $10/hour), that’s another $9,600.  That’s a yearly total of $67,200, which is DEFINITELY enough to live off of (My family of 4 lived off of about $80,000/year until my mom got a job, but she did that more out of boredom than need for more cash inflow.  And we were decently well off.  We aren’t rich, but we’re definitely nowhere close to going broke.), even though they may get a little less when it comes to health care.

Will this save Detroit or Michigan? No.

Detroit and Michigan have followed classic liberal policies of treating businesses as prey, rather than as assets. They have helped kill the goose that lays the golden eggs. So have the unions. So have managements that have gone along to get along.

EXACTLY!  I was just talking about this the other day.  Every time one of the Big 3 is in financial trouble, they go to the UAW and ask them to take a pay cut.  The UAW, being filled with greedy Americans says no.  So instead of setting a good example and taking a 50-75% pay cut, the management simply sat there and said, “You need to take a pay cut, otherwise we may go bankrupt.  The UAW continues to say, “No.  And if you don’t give in, we’ll go on strike.”  So, the company heads wind up giving in.  If I were head of any of the Big 3 right now, I’d immediately decrease my pay to $0.  Then, I’d tell the unions, “Take a pay cut, or go on strike.”  If they didn’t take a pay cut, I’d let them go on strike and hire new workers.  If a court ruled that I’m not allowed to hire new workers, I’d let the strike continue.  Eventually, the workers will have to come back to work or the company will fail.  If the company fails, it was the union’s fault for not showing up to work.  But the UAW wouldn’t let the company completely fail, because then their workers would be out of a job.  The corporate heads need to 1) lead by example, and 2) have some guts and stand up to the UAW.

Toyota, Honda and other foreign automakers are not heading for Detroit, even though there are lots of experienced automobile workers there. They are avoiding the rust belts and the policies that have made those places rust belts.

A bailout of Detroit’s Big Three would be only the latest in the postponements of reality. As for automobile dealers, they can probably sell Toyotas just as easily as they sold Chevvies. And Toyotas will require just as many tires per car, as well as other parts from automobile parts suppliers.

So, there you have it.  This was one of the best analyses I’ve seen on the auto bailout, and I couldn’t agree more.

Who’s at fault, the UAW or the corporate heads?  Both.  The UAW needs to stop being greedy and be willing to take a pay cut.  The leaders of the Big 3 need to lead by example and take MASSIVE pay cuts and start standing up to the unions.

Done Ranting,

Ranting Republican
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John and Revé Walsh Hold a Press Conference on the Solving of Adam Walsh’s Murder by Ottis Toole

December 16, 2008

Today, the Hollywood, Florida Police Department announced that the case of Adam Walsh’s murder had been solved and that Ottis Toole, a long-time suspect was indeed the killer.  This decision was made by Police Chief Chad Wagner, the Hollywood Police Department, the Broward County District Attorney’s office, and the Walsh family.

After Adam was murdered, John and Revé Walsh, Adam’s parents, became advocates for missing children and founded the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children.  The Walshs also helped in getting the Missing Children Act of 1982, Missing Children’s Assistance Act of 1984, and Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 passed.

Here’s 3 clips of today’s press conference (all courtesy of MSNBC).  The first is Chief Wager’s statement:

And here is Revé’s statement to the press:

And lastly, here is John’s statement at the press conference:

Well, I am happy that this case has  finally been solved.  I’ve always watched America’s Most Wanted, and I have a lot of respect of the Walsh family and what they do.  I am glad that justice was finally served for little Adam.  My thoughts and prayers are with all the other families who have gone through what the Walsh family has gone through these past 27 years.

Done Reporting,

Ranting Republican

Where Was the Secret Service When President Bush Had 2 Shoes Thrown at Him?

December 15, 2008

Alright, I had hoped on doing this post earlier today, but I spent the entire day driving around trying to get a flu shot.

Anyway, I’m sure by now that most of you saw/heard about the incident where an Iraqi reporter threw 2 shoes at President Bush during a press conference on a surprise trip to Baghdad.  If you haven’t seen it, here’s the video:

Now, I can understand the Secret Service not stopping the first shoe throwing, but the second one (2 seconds later) never should have happened.  Why wasn’t the Secret Service shielding President Bush?  What if that hadn’t just been shoes?  What if it was a knife or some sharp object?

In my opinion, the Secret Service was way too slow to react here.  Hopefully something like this doesn’t happen again, but if it does, I hope the Secret Service does a better job of getting in the way quicker.

Done Ranting,

Ranting Republican
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